Category Archives: Financial returns

Wallis and Futuna rejection of seabed mining welcomed by Pacific NGOs

Photo: AFP

Radio New Zealand | 24 September 2018

A decision by traditional leaders in Wallis and Futuna to reject work related to seabed mining has been welcomed by a regional body of non-government groups.

Earlier this month the kingdoms on the French Pacific island of Futuna ruled out allowing any further exploration of the seabed in their waters, saying their stance is final.

The Pacific Islands Association of NGOs ,or PIANGO, said it stands with community and church groups around the region who call for a ban on seabed mining.

PIANGO director Emele Duituturaga said there were environmental concerns and also a lack of clarity around the financial benefits that resource owners will directly receive.

She said in the current geo-political environment and age of cheque-diplomacy it is important for the voices of the people to be heard.

“Now is the time for traditional leaders and our indigenous peoples, who are the main owners of our resources, to stand up and be counted.”

Emele Duituturagasaid the lessons and experiences of mining in the Pacific should be heeded when contemplating exploration of the seabed.

She said there should be a ban on seabed mining around the region, and that the same environmental and benefit issues surrounding terrestrial mining, exist around seabed exploration.

“We’ve not really seen any income from terrestrial mining. We’ve also seen the environmental degradation so we doubt very much that seabed mining will be any different.”

French scientists have visited the territory and said the question of underwater mining will remain.

Five years ago, the French Economic, Social and Environmental Council urged the government to secure resources in the seabed off France’s overseas territories.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Environmental impact, Financial returns, Human rights, Pacific region

Local Gold Miners Get Raw Deal From Australian Buyer

Jerry Sefe | Post Courier | September 19, 2018

A small scale gold miner in Morobe is now worried that he might not be able to get the sum of money worth his 4.6 kilogram gold given to an Australian gold buyer in 2013.
The miner (named) who is a local from Aseki in Menyamya district told Post-Courier that his gold weighing 4.6kg was given in exchange of payment and business to an international gold buyer named Chris Walker of Brisbane, Australia in 2013, but he has never received his complete payment up until today.
He said it was through the arrangement of PNG National Small Scale Miners Association Incorporation vice president and general secretary Joe Bronston that linked him including 15 other gold owners from various provinces to go into business with Chris Walker.
It is now after six years and he is still waiting for the complete payment of his gold.
He said Mr Walker has also taken 45kg of gold from the other 15 individuals and wanted them to keep topping up the gold until 100kg then he would move his business to Port Moresby and work with them.
“I was only given AUS$10, 000 (PGK 23,489.4) as a spending money according to Mr Walker and his wife Jessica Groff while 1.5kg of the total 4.6kg of gold was going to be my share in the business and rest of the payment was supposed to be given to me later,” the man said.
However nothing turned out the way he expected in the agreement between Mr Walker and him.
A detailed statement from Mr Bronston said he knew Chris Walker and Peter Walker for almost 20 years and have been living together as families in PNG in 1988.
However, Mr Bronston when speaking to Post-Courier described Mr Walker and wife Jessica of Noosa, Queensland as perpetrators despite their close family relationship.
Mr Bronston said one of the most talked about business between them was how to develop alluvial mining in PNG from which in 2010, Mr Walker came up with the plan to introduce PNG Bullion Exchange in PNG.
“I informed various miners in different parts of the country and we agreed to Chris Walkers plan and the first four day meeting was held in Brisbane to achieve the plan of producing 100 kilos of gold so it would give confidence to investors to come to PNG to set up PNG Gold Exchange trade centre” said Mr Bronston.
Mr Bronston said the negotiation with miners to go into business with Mr Walker was agreed by all and the trip was taken care of by Queensland customs Broker Glenys Gardener whom was contracted by Australian Coin and Bullion Exchange in Melbourne.
“I did 18 trips of gold delivery under my PNG Mining Department Export Permit as Geological Sampling to Walker in Brisbane. Meanwhile the gold had a purity rate of 89percent (gold purity), Mr Bronston said.
He said each time he brought the gold to Mr Walker, after confirming weight and genuineness, he then transports the precious metal to the Australian Coin & Bullion Exchange for analysis and sampling, where the gold is then refined to 99.99 gold purity.
“Until 2013 the miners began following up on the establishment of Gold Exchange Trading in Port Moresby as promised. Subsequently this led to the disappearance of the Walkers.
“I told them in one of the gathering of miners in Port Moresby that we must continue to produce and arrive at 100kg of pure gold then the establishment of PNG GOLD Exchange will be announced, by the time the 45kg pure gold was already in Brisbane.
“However I was reported to the detectives at Boroko police station by miners repeatedly by different miners who doubted this work program (100kg gold exchange) as they felt it would drag on”, Mr Bronston said.
He said some of the miners wanted money for their gold, others listened and followed what was said while a few took his families as hostage at one time.
“I stopped delivering when I noticed Mr Walker and his wife Jessica stopped responding to my calls and emails during the tussle.
“I even flew down twice to follow up but still no indication of their presence. They had their address changed and perhaps went into hiding,” he said.
He said the matter was also reported to the Noosa Heads Police station and a complaint was also filed with Detectives Chad Kereama and Jason Brown. The investigation has since taken four years and is still pending.

4 Comments

Filed under Australia, Financial returns, Papua New Guinea

Resource Agreements Unfair: Haiveta

Mayur Resources managing director Paul Mulder signing an agreement in 2017 with Gulf Provincial Governor Chris Havieta 

Post Courier | September 18, 2018

GULF Governor Chris Haiveta has told his people that current agreements for oil, gas and forestry were not negotiated in their favour.

Delivering his independence message in Kerema last weekend, Mr Haiveta said he wants all agreements under the UBSA and LBSA re-visited and re-negotiated.

He said he felt his people – the majority resource owners – had been short changed and robbed of their resources.

Mr Haiveta and his people hosted Governor General Sir Bob Dadae over the Independence long weekend.

He said: “Our province recognises that current resource agreements in oil and gas and forestry have not been negotiated in the province’s favour.

“This has meant that essential and strategic infrastructure like ports, towns and roads in the project areas have not been built, leaving the province, Kikori district where the projects are located, particularly to miss out completely.

“Therefore we are moving in this term of parliament to ensure that all these agreements are revisited and they are legally compliable and enforceable by all parties.

“We have resolved the UBSA and LBSA agreements including the Gulf landowners and Provincial Governments benefits from the existing Oil and LNG Pipeline to Caution Bay be re-negotiated.”

He said that for the future, ‘we will ensure that resources agreements are properly negotiated and drafted to include all necessary and possible infrastructure needs for the project areas, including the upcoming LNG, coal mining, limestone, mineral sand mining and timber harvesting’.

Mr Haiveta said: “We are glad the national government has started the process of devolution of powers from Waigani to provinces, and Gulf Province is poised to receive decentralisation of powers soon.

“As a step forward to this, we will be signing the Service Delivery Partnership Agreements soon which will pave the way for a synchronised delivery of services between the two open electorates and the provincial government.”

He said his people have abundant renewable and non renewable natural resources both on the land and in the seas.

“Our sea boundaries encompass an area that is twice our land mass, we have significant marine resources with reef systems such as Pocklington and Eastern Fields that remain unexplored commercially and for tourism.

“We also have the largest prawn fishery in the country which is exploited directly from Port Moresby.

“Our forestry industry composed from Port round logging exports brings little benefit to the province as it is a nationally controlled activity.”

1 Comment

Filed under Financial returns, Papua New Guinea

Cooks govt looking at seabed mining interest in Norway

Cook Islands Finance Minister Mark Brown Photo: Phillipa Webb / Cook Islands News

Radio New Zealand | 14 September 2018

The Cook Islands Deputy Prime Minister Mark Brown is currently in Norway discussing the possible exploration of seabed minerals in the Cook Islands waters.

The Cook Islands News reports that manganese nodules found in the Cook Islands, lie on the seabed, at depths of more than 5000 metres.

According to initial scientific studies, the nodules were of a very high quality and there is a large quantity on the seabed which could make the nation billions of dollars.

Mr Brown said they would re-advertise the tenders as there had been some new interest in exploring the seabed.

He added that all practices, including exploration and the extraction of the minerals, would have to be done in a manner which was environmentally friendly and did not impact negatively on the Cook Islands.

1 Comment

Filed under Cook Islands, Exploration, Financial returns

RTG-led consortium meets Bougainville Gov’t over Panguna project

Australian Mining | September 12, 2018

ASX-listed RTG Mining has presented its redevelopment proposal for the Panguna mine to the House of Representatives in Bougainville in a significant step forward for the project.

RTG Mining is leading a consortium of local landowners in Bougainville, an autonomous region of Papua New Guinea (PNG), that is trying to win government support in order to restart operations at the mine, currently under consideration for redevelopment by Government-backed Bougainville Copper (BCL).

The mine’s relaunch is a keystone of Bougainville’s upcoming plans for independence.

The dormant Panguna copper mine, which has been abandoned since 1989 due to local conflicts, contributed roughly 40 per cent of PNG’s economy during the height of operation.

The consortium, led by landowners, presented its proposal last week to a number of representatives of the Bougainville Government and is currently developing a social licence to win further support.

This includes donations for the local Arawa hospital, school and education support, support for the Women’s Federation in Bougainville and sport sponsorship opportunities, including the local rugby sevens team, the Black Orchids.

“This gesture of support by RTG is significant towards our efforts to compliment our ABG Government including all stakeholders on Bougainville working towards a united and peaceful Bougainville,” said Peter Tsiamalili, Autonomous Bougainville Rugby president.

Leave a comment

Filed under Financial returns, Papua New Guinea

‘Reform PNG’s Resource Ownership Laws’

Henzy Yakham | Post Courier | September 12, 2018

The conversation on ownership of natural resources has intensified in recent times with the issue moved from the simmer-back to hot-and the front-burner.

In the forefront and pressing for revolutionary reforms in the resource ownership regime are two of PNG’s founding statesmen – Sir Julius Chan and Sir Mekere Morauta.

Both Sir Julius and Sir Mekere played very significant roles during pre-independence years as architects to craft the foundations of PNG’s currency, banking and financial institutions, which in succeeding years underwent further reforms to improve their service delivery.

Today, the two former prime ministers are calling for changes to the resource ownership laws so that the original inhabitants of land and sea where the natural resources are found have fair and equitable benefits. In November 2013, despite not attending a Madang meeting of governors from maritime provinces due to prior confirmed official engagements, Sir Julius provided a brief paper to his colleagues on the development of PNG’s extractive industries, ownership of natural resources and related issues. Included in the brief was Sir Julius’ stance that land/resource owners’ rights to own natural resources on and under their land and sea as his proposed remedies in the mining industry.

The brief highlighted a number of aspects in which PNG has failed to structure the mining industry for maximum value to PNG and its citizens. With the brief were comparisons of mineral royalty rates of PNG (which are among the lowest in the world), and other countries which include:

Poland: 10 per cent contained metal value
Ghana: 3 -12 per cent sliding with price
Canada: 15 per cent (British Columbia) taxable income; 18 per cent (Ontario) of taxable income 20 per cent; (Quebec) of taxable income
Mozambique: 10 -12 per cent diamond; 5-8 per cent precious metals
Mexico: 8 per cent gold
Botswana: 10 per cent diamonds; 5 per cent precious metals
United States: 12.5 – 16 per cent Oil; 8 – 20 per cent precious metals
Papua New Guinea: 2 per cent gold; 2 per cent copper

Sir Julius maintains that PNG’s mining regime is grossly distorted and unfair because billions of kina are earned, but the real land, and resources owners simply do not realise their fair share of the benefits.

In a nutshell, he has been pushing for among others:

– Royalties raised to 10 per cent f.o.b. annual revenues;
– SSG raised to 10 per cent f.o.b. annual revenues and SSG payments should be made directly from the company to the province;
– Tax Credit raised to 10 per cent of assessable income and funds should be placed in an account the year of eligibility with no time limit on the use of funds;
– The State receive at least 30 per cent equity in all mining projects free of charge, and should convey a significant portion of this equity to the province, the LLG and the landowners;
– Twenty per cent (20 per cent) of all royalties, special support grants, tax credit and dividends from equity holdings be placed in a separate account to be used for development projects in non-mining provinces; and
– The Mining Act 1992 be comprehensively reviewed and amended, specifically such that ownership of all minerals on and below the sea is vested in the province in whose waters minerals are located.

PNG’s Mining Act 1992, states that all minerals existing on, in, or below the surface of any land in PNG, water lying in any land in PNG, are the property of the State. During colonial rule, the mining and petroleum laws of PNG were adopted based on Australian precedents, giving the powers of ownership of resources in the Administrator. Under the common law of England, minerals belong to the owner of the land under which they are found.

The British Common Law, inherited by Australian colonies upon white settlement, included a presumption that the owner of the land is entitled to all that lies above and below the surface.

Natural resources such as minerals were regarded as part of the land in which they naturally occurred and accordingly passed into private ownership upon Crown grant of the land. Despite these arguments, in the end the Australian Statutory Law in place during colonial times prevailed over both PNG law and British Common Law, this was formalised in the Mining Act 1992. However, it is very clear that State ownership violates both traditional PNG law and British Common Law.

In April 2013, Sir Julius told the Parliamentary Referral Committee on Minerals and Energy inquiry into the review of Mining Act 1992 that under current laws, PNG simply gives away all its wealth and then buys it back at an exorbitant price.

On August 19, 2013, Sir Julius was the Keynote Speaker at the Department of Mineral Policy and Geohazards Management (DMPGM) organised regional consultation meetings in Kokopo, East New Britain Province on the proposed changes to Mining Act 1992. There, he outlined the way in which the mining regime in PNG has failed the people and the way it should be changed for the greater benefit of the people and provinces.

On May 14, 2009, Sir Julius proposed reforms in natural resource ownership laws in a motion tabled in Parliament.
The underlying intention of the motion was for the transfer of the resource ownership to landowners of where the resources are found. As well, the motion proposes for increased benefits for landowners, provincial governments and the country in general.

Sir Julius argues that as a direct consequence of the arrogation of all mineral, oil and gas reserves on land and below the land and sea by the State have been a massive give-away of the national wealth of PNG.

On September 4, 2018, Sir Mekere asked Prime Minister Peter O’Neill a series of questions based on important national issues raised by Sir Julius in his reply to the inaugural address of the Governor General in opening this Parliament.

Sir Mekere prefaced his question to Mr O’Neill by quoting Sir Julius “to remember that in our democracy the final power is the power of the people. We are here for one reason only – to serve the people”.

“I want to take a wider view of the challenges we face. For though we have some short-term problems to tackle, I fear there are even more grave problems looming over us.

“I have never known a time when our country was in greater peril.”

After quoting Sir Julius, Sir Mekere asked Mr O’Neill what the government position on Sir Julius’ recommendations among others to:

– Increase the level of royalties from the current 2 per cent to 10 per cent;
– Increase the level of Special Support Grant and the Tax Credit Scheme;
– Establish a Trust Fund in which 20 per cent of revenues of mining provinces would be paid to distribute to non-mining provinces;
– Revise the Mining Act 1992 and the Oil and Gas Act 1998 to vest ownership of resources in the people;
– Introduce a Derivation Grant for mining and petroleum provinces of 5 per cent of the value of resources originating in that province;
– Increase Autonomy of Provinces, provinces “that demonstrate capacity to manage their own affairs. The autonomy was to cover administrative and financial autonomy and autonomy over non-renewable and renewable resources.

Answering Sir Mekere’s questions, Mr O’Neill said “the Mining Act is under review at present and I will not pre-empt the discussions and the outcomes of that review that is taking place.

“The Mining Minister and his team are already well advanced in those discussions. There will be an opportunity for this Parliament to look through that review and the new Mining Act, which will address all these issues, including royalties, the powers of the provinces with respect to the mining activities in those provinces and the management of the trust funds.

“There has been a gross abuse in the management of some of the trust funds and we are all aware and are trying to correct that as we move forward.

“I can assure you, that the people of Papua New Guinea, particularly the landowners will get a better share of the benefits of the resource development in this country.

“That is the priority of this government and we will continue to pursue it through the mining review which is now being conducted and is still continuing.”

1 Comment

Filed under Financial returns, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Group wants Wafi-Golpu mining town at home

The National aka The Loggers Times | September 12, 2018

The people of the Mumeng local- level government in Bulolo district, Morobe, do not want Wafi-Golpu’s mining town to be in the Huon Gulf district. They want it at home.

The group called Pikinini Mumeng made their stand known during a forum held on Saturday at Gurakor.

Spokespersons Max Giamati and Toksy Mon told The National the people of Mumeng were fighting for the rights of their children and they did not want their children to miss out on any benefit from the Wafi mine.

Giamati said the forum was for the developers, the Morobe government and the State to explain the benefits the Mumeng community would gain from the mine, the mining township, and the formation of Mumeng Landowners’ Association.

“Just because the pipeline will run through Huon Gulf they want to build the township there, but we are against the idea,” he said.

“We are not saying no to the pipeline but because of the future of our children we want the township and service to be in Bulolo District.

“A good example is the Hidden Valley Mine where the services and township should be in Bulolo District but has been moved down to Lae. We do not want to see this process repeated with Wafi-Golpu.”

The Pikinini Mumeng group said that further exploration on their land would not be carried out unless there was discussions with the people of Mumeng on what benefits Wafi-Golpu would provide.

The group will have another meeting on Saturday at Kumalu Dust Market and the Mumeng LLG president and Bulolo MP Sam Basil are being invited to attend.

2 Comments

Filed under Financial returns, Human rights, Papua New Guinea