Tag Archives: Caritas

Sea Bed Mining is an invasion of indigenous livelihoods

Image: Alliance of Solwara Warriors

 Caritas PNG | ACT NOW! | 24 January 2018

Deep sea bed mining is the extraction of metals such as iron, manganese, copper, zinc, lead nickel, cadmium, silver, platinum gold and rare earths from the sea floor.

The Parliament decision for granting license to Nautilus (Under Sea Bed Mining) in Papua New Guinea waters is a disgraceful act of genocide on all levels of life in PNG history.

According to Caritas Co-ordinator, Chairman of the Indigenous priest association, Kokopo, Fr Mathias Lopa, the awarding license to Nautilus Sea Bed Mining is a preferential choice for more money over the indigenous livelihood.

He said that in a diagnostic view, we should say that, it is political preferential choice for ecological destruction of natural environment and sustainability of livelihood.

He stated that it is a shame for the authorities not listening to the people’s voice and no considerable attention given to the result of the independent scientific research study on the fragility and venerability of life under the sea. The scientific study proves the imminent destructive impact on human life and the natural coexistence as an eventual consequence of such an economic venture.

He said that should there be any rational thinking Papua New Guinean could explain to all citizens of this nation, why Papua New Guinea has many major mining operations by foreign investors as well as reaping of the virgin forest and grabbing land to make millions of kina as revenue over night and yet our rural population still lack basic services.

Fr Lopa added that concurrently signing of agreement between Papua New Guinea (NEC) and Nautilus, Sea Bed mining company is ethically questionable.

He said that the people of the NGI region considered the parliamentary decision on sea bed mining as pre mature, short-sighted and imprudent decision.

He stated that it is a common knowledge that PNG as a nation has no skill and knowledge on how to restore and rebuild the lives of the sea living organism when imposing of an unimaginable and pre-mediative act of crime against nature by an affluent nation.

He said that the short sighted and non-evaluative decision by Parliamentary Bureaucracy is an outcome of being blind folded by foreign economic creed.

He also said that using the robot to destabilize the eco-system of life under the sea that sustains life on the land is a scary scenario.

He said that such an invasion on non-renewable resources is an act of economic terrorism against the basic foundation of life under, within and above the sea.

Therefore, our life is at the mercy of the capitalist economic imperialism.

Fr Lopa stated that the arrogant of authorities for not listening to the people’s plea is a sign of psychological fear of offending the international relationship based on agreement.

He said that as thinking citizens, we need to rationally speculate and conceptualize the possible terrifying scenario if revoking of international agreement that would cost our nation a significantly amount of penalty payment.

He also said that the ethical question that ought not to be avoided is, what is important, the agreement with the company or the future generation and their natural resources.

He questioned as to why harvest all non-renewable resources with no due consideration of the future generation. Consuming all resource for the future generation to pay the debt of the present incurring nation’s economic debt is morally unacceptable.

Fr Lopa urged all fellow citizens that we have a social obligation and constitutional responsibility to speak up as openly guaranty by our constitution to air your views on this matter.

He said that the citizens of New Guinea Islands region are concern about our lives and the lives of our children and their children. Of course we need money and we do have various means of making money.

He questioned as to why resort to sea bed mining at this time. The politicians of the New Guinea islands have the political obligation and ethical responsibility to protect the lives of their voters and make our islands a safer place to live and enjoy life.

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Filed under Environmental impact, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Caritas Calls For Halt To Experimental Deep Sea Mining

Caritas Aotearoa | SCOOP | 13 July 2017

“We call for an immediate halt to all deep-sea mining including exploratory testing as this will undermine the ability to achieve sustainable development goal 14” said Julianne Hickey, Director of Caritas Aotearoa New Zealand, speaking in New York at an event associated with a United Nations High Level Political Forum on the progress towards achieving Sustainable Development Goals.

Mrs Hickey expressed deep concerns about the long-term impact on the oceans and marine life arising from experimental Deep Sea Mining.

“Such mining is far from being an established practice around the world. The technology involved is in its infancy and it is not credible to talk about so-called ‘best-practice’ regulatory regimes in the Oceania region. The fact is that many of the countries in which multinational mining corporations are seeking licenses do not have established regulatory scrutiny of such activities.”

“A factor that exacerbates the risks is the huge reliance of communities on the oceans. For example our community partners in Kiribati and the Solomon Islands rely on the oceans and healthy marine ecosystems for their very livelihoods” said Mrs Hickey.

But there was some good news too. Caritas welcomed two specific initiatives towards better care of the oceans and marine resources. In particular Mrs Hickey highlighted the development of special Marine Protection Areas in Tonga.

“The development of Marine Protection Areas at Felemea in the Ha’apai Islands of Tonga signals a very welcome approach to sustainable use practices in the region” said Mrs Hickey.

“We also acknowledge and welcome the move by the New Zealand government to ban plastic microbeads which have been shown to be harmful to waterways, fish and shellfish” said Mrs Hickey.

Mrs Hickey was speaking in New York this morning (NZ time) to an event associated with a United Nations High Level Political Forum on the progress towards achieving Sustainable Development Goals. The specific goal on which Mrs Hickey presented was Goal 14: conserving and sustainably using the oceans, seas and marine resources – with regard to the Oceania region.

Mrs Hickey is representing Caritas Oceania in order to ensure that the voices of Pacific peoples are heard on the world stage. Caritas works closely with partner organisations around the Pacific region – including Samoa, Kiribati, Fiji, Tonga, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea.

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Filed under Environmental impact, Exploration, Human rights, Mine construction, Pacific region, Papua New Guinea

Experimental Seabed Mining and the Controversial Solwara 1 Project in Papua New Guinea

The Deep Sea Mining Campaign is a collaboration of organizations and citizens from Papua New Guinea, Australia and Canada concerned with the likely impacts of deep sea mining on marine and coastal ecosystems and communities.

Peter Neill – Director, World Ocean Observatory | Huffington Post | July 11, 2017

It has been some time since we’ve reflected on the issue of deep sea mining — the search for minerals of all types on the ocean floor. We have seen already how marine resources are being over-exploited — over-fishing by international fisheries being the most egregious example, mining for sand for construction projects and the creation of artificial islands, the exploitation of coral reefs and certain marine species for medical innovations and the next cure for human diseases based on understanding and synthesis of how such organisms function.

The Deep Sea Mining Campaign, an organization based in Australia and Canada, has been following the saga of Solwara 1, proposed by Nautilus Inc. for offshore Papua New Guinea that continues to seek financing year after year since 2011. The project is basically a kind of corporate speculation premised on the lucrative idea of the availability of such minerals conceptually in the region — indeed the company has declined to conduct a preliminary economic study or environmental risk assessment, the shareholders essentially engaged in a long odds probability wager comparable to those who invested in marine salvagers attempts to find and excavate “pay-ships” lost at sea with purported vast cargos of silver and gold. The idea that they should be required to justify their endeavors to governments, third-world or otherwise, or to coastwise populations whose livelihood and lives depend on a healthy ocean from which they have harvested for centuries, is anathema.

Deep Sea Mining recently reported on the recent Nautilus Annual General Meeting where CEO Michael Johnston was asked:

· Is it true that without the normal economic and feasibility studies, the economic viability of Solwara 1 is unknown?

· Is it true that the risk to shareholders of losing their entire investment in Nautilus is high and the potential returns promoted by Nautilus are entirely speculative?

· Is this why Nautilus is struggling to obtain the investment to complete the construction of its vessel and equipment?

According to the release, Johnston declined to have his responses recorded and evaded providing clear answers. He did, however, affirm the description accuracy of the Solwara 1 project in the Annual Information Forms as a ‘high’ and ‘significant’ risk.

Local communities are also not interested in the Nautilus experiment. In recent weeks, two large forums against the Solwara 1 deep sea mining project in the Bismarck Sea have been held in New Ireland and East New Britain provinces of Papua New Guinea. Supported by the Catholic Bishops and Caritas Papua New Guinea , both forums called for the halt of the Solwara 1 project and a complete ban on seabed mining in Papua New Guinea and the Pacific. Here are some comments from those meetings:

Patrick Kitaun, Caritas PNG Coordinator:

“The Bismarck Sea is not a Laboratory for the world to experiment with seabed mining. Our ocean is our life! We get all our basics from the ocean so we need to protect it. We will not allow experimental seabed mining in Papua New Guinea. It must be stopped and banned for good.”

Jonathan Mesulam of the Alliance of Solwara Warriors:

“Nautilus, we are not guinea pigs for your mining experiment! We in the Pacific are custodians of the world’s largest ocean. These oceans are important to us as sources of food and livelihoods. They are vital for our culture and our very identity. In New Ireland Province, we are only 25 km away from the Solwara 1 site. It is right in the middle of our traditional fishing grounds. We will stand up for our rights!”

Vicar General, Father Vincent Takin of the Diocese of Kavieng:

“In order, for any development to take place, the people must be the object of development and not subject to it. The people have not been fully informed about the impacts of Solwara 1 on the social, cultural, physical and spiritual aspects of their lives. Therefore they cannot give their consent.”

Nautilus Inc. does not appear to be major international energy company with the assets available to force this project forward as others might. The opposition is well organized and vocal with arguments and expectations that the company cannot overcome. We hope. As with offshore oil exploration alongshore and it the deep ocean, this project is isolated in an opposing political context and shifting market. It is not for this time, for these people in these places, who have no concern for the loss of the `stranded assets of invisible gamblers in the face of the gain of conserving and sustaining their ocean resources for local benefit and the future.

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Filed under Corruption, Environmental impact, Financial returns, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

‘No harm in Experimental Seabed mining’ says Minister

Vice Minister relying on mining company literature rather than independent science to justify seabed experiment

Merolyn Ten | Post Courier | March 10, 2017

THE world-first seabed mining project in Papua New Guinea due to start in 2019 will not be harmful to the environment, says Mining Vice-Minister Wera Mori.

But, no we don’t have any independent science to back this up – I just rely on what the mining company says!

Mr Mori is confident that the Solwara 1 project that will mine copper and gold deposits from the seafloor at a depth of 1600 metres in the Bismarck Sea, off New Ireland Province, does not pose a major environmental hazard.

“The seabed mining offers an alternative that could be less environmentally destructive than land-based mining. The copper deposit on the sea floor are about 10 times more concentrated than a typical land-based copper mine, so less material needs to be extracted to achieve a similar production rate,” he said.

“Could be less environmentally destructive” – sounds like someone is guessing!

Hard to think the noise and vibration of 100 tonne machines strip mining the sea floor is not going to have some impact on whales, dolphins, sharks and other marine life…

Mr Mori said the deposits were at the surface, so large amounts of material did not need to be removed. Unlike land-based mining, seabed mining occurs where people do not live and requires little production infrastructure, and increased worker safety with the operations being conducted remotely.

He said that the metals will be mined into the subsea slurry lift pump (SSLP) and transported through the riser and lifting system (RALS) pipe straight onto the mining ship or the production support vessel (PSV).

“The mined copper and gold deposits will be then taken straight to demanding countries including Japan, China, Korea and India.”

And all the unwanted waste rock and sand and silt will be pumped straight back into the ocean – please don’t leave that part out, Mr Minister…

Nautilus Minerals is the Canadian company in charge of the Solwara 1 Project, being developed in a joint venture with State entity Kumul Minerals Holdings.

However, according to the Deep Sea Mining Campaign, a project of the Ocean Foundation, Solwara 1 Project would represent “the first large scale, human-induced, site-specific disturbance to the deep ocean basin anywhere in the world, hence it must be considered with exceptional deliberation and caution”.

A call has been made to the Government to place a ban on the experimental seabed mining.

This call was made by the Caritas Co-ordinators of the 19 Catholic dioceses in solidarity with Alliance of Solwara Warriors, Bismarck Ramu Group, and concerned organisations that resolved to speak out on behalf of the silent majority affected by the proposed “experimental seabed mining” of Nautilus Minerals Limited.

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