Tag Archives: Guangdong Rising Assets Management

Sepik people say no to Frieda River mine

Advertisements

Leave a comment

February 4, 2019 · 8:23 am

MP wants mines to learn from Ok Tedi’s history of pollution

Will the mighty Sepik River end up a “dead river” like her sister, the Fly?

The National aka The Loggers Times | February 1, 2019

NORTH Fly MP James Donald says the pollution of the Fly River by Ok Tedi mine should be a lesson for other mines in the country.

He called for a review of the Porgera Gold Mine because the mine was contributing to pollution.

Donald said with huge pollution issues facing the province, the experience of Ok Tedi and Fly River should be a lesson for other mines like the Frieda mine project whose operation can affect the Sepik River.

Donald said to put his grievance on record, the Conversation Environment Protection Agency (formerly the Department of Environment and Conservation) had been “very weak”.

He said record showed that issues of the people were never handled.

Donald said the people of Western were being affected by the activities of Ok Tedi and Porgera mines, therefore there was a need to review the Porgera mine operations because it was affecting the Fly River.

“People are really affected and how can you allow us to be affected by two mines like these? We have to review Porgera also because we are feeling the pain of the damage caused by the two mines,” he said.

NCD Governor Powes Parkop said dumping mine waste into the river system is only practised in PNG.

“No other country practises them, not even in the US, in Europe or Australia but here we allow that to happen. Are we less human in allowing mining companies to dump their sediments and waste into the river systems?

“We must continue to invest in tailing dams, we can‘t continue to dump tailings into the river.”

1 Comment

Filed under Environmental impact, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

MP Mirisim Supports No Fly-In-Fly-Out for Frieda mine

Matthew Vari | Post Courier | January 23, 2019

Member for Telefomin and Minister for Defence, Solan Mirisim has appealed to the Freida River project developers to seriously not take on the fly-in-fly-out arrangements for mine staff.
Mr Mirisim said this last week during a press conference held alongside Minister for National Planning and Yangoru-Saussia MP Richard Maru and Ambunti Drekikir MP Johnson Wapunai in Port Moresby regarding the Freida River project development.
“That also goes for Freida River project, there is no fly-in-fly-out, there is got to be a township so let the landowners and all the employers comes in to participate in the local economy and communities.
“So let me appeal to the company or developer that there should not be any fly in fly out and there has got to be a township.
“Township we have been planning for a big airport in Green River in the center where the township can be up to the Freida River project township.”Mr Mirisin’s district sits where the project is set to be developed, and his comments on the issue were made on the back of Minister Maru’s stance on the issue that no such arrangement is to take place for the Wafi-Golpu project in Morobe.“We are building a national airport there (Morobe) at the cost of K1.5 billion. It has a city of its own and it will be an anchor development that will complement the airport.“And Morobe and Lae already have the wharf and facilities and I really want to see that, and there cannot be any excuse as far as I am concerned.“Morobe and Papua New Guinea must get maximum benefit from the development of their resources,” Mr Maru commented on the Wafi Golpu project development.

1 Comment

Filed under Financial returns, Mine construction, Papua New Guinea

Landowner anger grows about continuing mining destruction

Peter S Kinjap | PNG Attitude | January 21, 2019

One of the world’s largest underdeveloped copper and gold deposits on the Frieda River, a tributary of the Sepik, is opposed by local indigenous landowners and all right-thinking Papua New Guineans.

The Frieda River deposit is thought to contain 13 million tonnes of copper and 20 million ounces of gold and tens of thousands of people fear the likelihood of serious river system contamination and the threat to the ecosystem that supports them.

A spokesman for environment group Project Sepik, Emmanuel Peni, said there was widespread opposition to the mine’s development plan.

“From Iniok village, which is where the barges and ships stop at the Frieda River, right down to the mouth of the Sepik, people are against the mine,” Peni said.

“They are concerned about possible contamination of the river system and the destruction of the environment along the Frieda and the Sepik River system.”

The East Sepik Provincial government and the national government had not yet responded to the concerns and grievances that have been raised.

Land in the Papua New Guinea context means the natural environment including land, rivers and seas.

In Madang Province, the landowners of Basamuk, Begesin, Ramu and Kurumbukari villages are affected by the Ramu nickel mine in various ways.  The Chinese state-owned mine has been polluting the beautiful coastal seas and people have been denied their food gardens and fishing waters.

In a recent documentary, ‘Uprooted’, the people clearly showed their pain about the river system contamination and the environmental destruction. They are fearful of losing their land to large scale development.

The deep sea tailings placement (DSTP) method of mine waste management and disposal which the Ramu mine proposed and was approved by the PNG government is causing a lot of environmental destruction and river contamination. 

“I belong to the government and the government belongs to me,” Martin Dampat, a Mindere landowner, said in the documentary. “How can it abandon me? It must do all that it can to ensure that I am able to feed myself.

“It has the ability to do so. But, if it chooses not to, then I know the government has no concern for me.  We have reached our limits. We have done all we can. They’ve rejected everything we’ve said.

“We feel we can’t do anything anymore. Some have given up trying,” he said.

“There is a great heaviness in all our hearts. I don’t think anyone can remove it from within us. We will go. But our grandchildren bear hardships even greater that what we’re experiencing.”

Another disgruntled landowner, John Oma from Ganglau Landowner Company, said: “They don’t have the land to grow their food. They won’t have an ocean to catch their fish.

“Where will they eat from? Nowhere. Great hardship awaits them. We won’ be able to avoid the troubles that will come. It’s the same sea. Life will be difficult for them too.”

And Sama Mellombo from the Pommern Land Group in Ramu said:

“It’s a fearful feeling when you think about the health effects on people and the inhabitants of the seas. If we take action now to tell China to find an alternative method, I think that’s the right approach. Find an alternative method instead of dumping waste into the sea. We live by the sea.”

Former Madang governor, Sir Arnold Amet, said:

“The government has endorsed the actual deep sea tailings deposit and an environmental plan. I think it is our assurance that the laying down of the pipe will not affect the lives of our people.  

“And the whole project has been signed and sealed by the national government and relevant agencies.”

A confused landowner from Ramu said:

“We hear that the minister has come. We hear that the member has come. We hear that the mine boss has come. But we’re confused. For the people here in Mindere and Ganglau, we feel like we’re about to die because we don’t have a Father. Our Father – the government – isn’t here.”

Bong Dampat, a mother and a Mindere villager, said:

“We fear for our children’s future. It’s going to be a long time. When waste dumped here, unborn children could be affected. The government and the company must pay attention. They cannot ignore us. What kind of a future will our children have? They have to pay attention.

“When a mining development contract allowed the Chinese to own and operate the mine, there was no concept of safety or environmental standards.  It was a cowboy operation. You did whatever you wanted and it didn’t matter if you were injured. It seems they came with a set of rules that didn’t comply with the rules of our country.”

“This is not a fight against development. No. That isn’t why we’re campaigning,” said Ramu landowner Michael Kasuk.

“We are fighting to protect and save our environment, our forests, our land, our river systems and our seas because our existence is connected to the land, forests, river systems and the sea,” Mr Kasuk said.

Peter S Kinjap is a freelance journalist, email pekinjap@gmail.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Environmental impact, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Naive Sepik MPs put their trust in lawyers to avert tailings disaster

The mighty Sepik river is under threat from toxic mine tailings

“For the tailings we will make sure we get independent legal experts to inform the government independently that the dam will not collapse under any earthquake or whatever scale of disaster,” Mr Maru said.

Sepik leaders support Frieda River Mine Project

PNG Today | January 19, 2019

Three Sepik leaders have openly thrown their support for the Frieda mine project to proceed.

Yangoru-Saussia MP and National Planning Minister, Richard Maru, Telefomin MP and Defense Minister, Solan Mirism and Ambunti-Dreikiki MP Johnson Wapunai gave their public support in a conference with the media in Port Moresby.

The leaders believe the project will unlock the vast economic potentials in some of the most remote areas in both East and West Sepik provinces:

“We are here to tell the nation, as Sepik leaders, we are right behind this project, and no cheap politics and no one will compromise this interest.

“This project must go on, provided that the environment is not compromised in any way.

“So I say to the developer, we the Sepik leaders will make sure the Sepik River is not compromised, and we’re happy the slurry is coming down by pipeline.

“For the tailings we will make sure we get independent legal experts to inform the government independently that the dam will not collapse under any earthquake or whatever scale of disaster,” Mr Maru said.

Frieda River Project is located in the provinces of West Sepik and East Sepik.

It is one of the biggest copper and gold deposits found in the Asia-Pacific region.

The mine is jointly owned by PanAust (80%) and Highlands Pacific (20%).

PanAust acquired the majority stake earlier held by Glencore in August 2014, becoming operator of the mine.

The acquisition agreement was made in October 2013.

The mine will be developed as an open cut operation.

Based on the pre-feasibility study completed in October 2010, the mine was expected to produce 246,000t of copper and 379,000 ounces (oz) of gold annually.

The estimated mine lifespan was more than 20 years.

A due diligence evaluation held by PanAust and Highlands Pacific however estimated average annual production of 125,000t of copper and 200,000oz of gold in concentrate assuming a processing rate of 30 million tonnes per annum.

Six main deposits, namely Horse, Ivaal, Truki, Nena, Koki and Ekwai, have been identified at the Frieda River copper and gold mine.

Leave a comment

Filed under Environmental impact, Mine construction, Papua New Guinea

MPs: ‘Stop misleading people on environmental pollution’

Frieda river mine camp

Sepik MPs denying history and the lessons learned from pollution at the ‘World Class’ Ok Tedi, Panguna, Porgera and Tolukuma mines…

The National aka The Loggers Times | January 18, 2019

Three Sepik MPs are appealing to East and West Sepik leaders to stop misleading the local people on environmental pollution caused by the Frieda River project.

Yangoru-Saussia MP and National Planning Minister Richard Maru, Telefomin MP Solan Mirisim and Ambunti-Drekikir MP Johnson Wapunai supported development of the project.

They said developer, PanAust, had revised its design to include a 320km pipeline to transport slurry to Vanimo for export.

Maru said he did not support the project at first because the proposal was for copper slurry to go down the Sepik River by barge to sea.

“I did not want to compromise the Sepik River in any way because of the experiences we’ve learnt from the Ok Tedi mine,” he said.

“I am extremely happy that the new developer has changed the development plan for the Frieda mine.

“They will now build a 320km pipeline to take the slurry from Frieda all the way to Vanimo.

“In line with that development plan, our Government has now funded the feasibility study and design of the new Vanimo wharf at a cost of over K30 million.

“The work is going on now.

“We expect that the feasibility study and the design will be completed by around March, latest April.

“Our Government has been proactive in making sure we have a wharf which shall cater for the requirements of the gold mine, Bewani oil palm project and vast economic activities that we want to create in the special economic zone in Vanimo.

“This is for us to trade into Asia using Vanimo as the major export port.

“I would like to appeal to East Sepik and West Sepik leaders to stop misleading the people of West and East Sepik and create unnecessary fear among them.”

Maru urged leaders and the public to get behind local MPs Mirisim and Wapunai and support development of the project.

“We are thankful that the developer has already submitted mine development plan and the application for special mining licence (SML) to the Mineral Resources Authority (MRA),” he said.

“We, as the leaders of East and West Sepik, will get behind this project, work with the NEC (National Executive Council) and the prime minister and not only deliver the Wafi-Golpu mine but the Frieda River mine also.”

The three MPs responded to recent awareness carried out by tertiary students on the environmental effects of the mine.

They said the environment would not be compromised in any way and the benefit streams were far better than what the Government and people have enjoyed in other mining projects.

The total cost of the project is estimated to be US$739 million (K2,443.50).

Leave a comment

Filed under Environmental impact, Mine construction, Papua New Guinea

Governor: ‘The safety of the Sepik River is non-negotiable’

East Sepik Governor, Alan Bird

Bird Needs More Views On Frieda Mine

Post Courier | January 17, 2019

EAST Sepik Governor Allan Bird will be seeking wider consultations on the proposed Frieda Mine for a more informed, truthful and transparent decision.

“Before we talk about Frieda consultations, I want everyone to know that I have listened to both sides of the argument and I have decided that the issue is too important for a small group or individual to take a decision in isolation,” Mr Bird said yesterday.

“Let us start by thinking about the Sepik River people for a moment, more particularly where we see them in 20 or 30 years time. Where do they see themselves in that timeframe?

“Will they still be fisher folk? Living a semi subsistence life, selling carvings and other artifacts and performing traditional dances for tourists? Or will more of them desire a decent education, a career or start a business and move to live in a town or city? The current generation might be happy living the traditional lifestyle but what about the younger generation? Is it fair to them that those of us on land see them as suppliers of fish for our sustenance? Is that where they should remain?

“Would a large scale mine, managed safely and properly add value to this process of change or badly managed do the opposite?

“There are no easy answers. Perhaps the answer lies in between. I have no doubt the River people are best placed to tell us their views of the future.”

Mr Bird said that he expected the East Sepik provincial government to do the right thing by everyone, to be fair and transparent, to give each stakeholder an opportunity, without fear, without intimidation to discuss their concerns (pros and cons) regarding Frieda Mine.

He said the provincial government would to take into account the desires of Telefomin Sepiks, Kopar Sepiks and every Sepik in between. “Let us not exclude PanAust as a stakeholder,” he said.

“This year we will have a team of experts look at the EIS and the mine development proposal. On a personal level my only concern is the safety of the river. Anything else, be they benefits for river people, landowners, etc are negotiable.

“The safety of the Sepik River is non-negotiable.”

1 Comment

Filed under Environmental impact, Financial returns, Human rights, Mine construction, Papua New Guinea