Tag Archives: Harmony Gold

Mine LOs Upset Over Change In Meeting Venue

Jerry Sefe | Post Courier | August 17, 2018

The landowners of Yanta and Hengambu in the Wafi-Golpu mining have agreed to work with the district and province to do what is right for the benefit of the mine.

The landowners, who did not attend the consultative meeting in Kokopo, described the forum as political maneuvering that was not in their interest.

Landowner representative Being Sombe alleged that there were suspicious deals made during the meeting.

Mr Sombe said since the closure of the meeting, they were not briefed or informed by their landowner association leaders on the discussions at the meeting.

“We are waiting for them to tell us why the meeting was taken to Kokopo and what was discussed and passed for the benefit of the impacted communities,” said Mr Sombe.

The landowners also questioned Bulolo MP Sam Basil and Morobe governor Ginson Saonu on why the consultative meeting was moved.

The leaders told landowners they were not happy with the move in meeting venue.

The leaders after discussions on the Kokopo forum assured the landowners to work with the provincial government to protect their interests.

Mr Basil said the authorities in mining areas will be engaged as stakeholders to represent the landowners’ issues and spearhead positive drive for landowners benefits in the mine.

They also admitted they were not properly consulted on the meeting to be held in Kokopo but were surprised to be invited.

“We must not repeat what has happened at Hidden Valley, whatever meetings for Wafi-Golpu mining in future must be held in Lae,” the leaders said.

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Morobe Leaders Unite On Wafi-Golpu Project

Benny Geteng | Post Courier | August 15, 2018

Several Morobean MPs including Governor Ginson Saonu have taken a united stand in calling for more Morobean presence in the Wafi-Golpu Mine Project.

This is first time ever for Morobe leaders to come together to show their concerns on the technical advisory and spinoff benefits from negotiations, construction phase, and the development of the Wafi-Golpu Project located between Bulolo district and Huon Gulf district.

The MPs – Morobe Governor Ginson Saonu, Bulolo MP Sam Basil, Huon-Gulf MP Ross Seymour, Tewae-Siassi MP Dr Kobby Bomareo, Nawaeb MP Kennedy Wenge and Lae MP John Rosso.

The emerging Morobe position aims to address lessons from the Bougainville Copper Limited and the crisis it ignited, the Ok Tedi Mining environmental issues that fueled the exit of BHP Billiton, landowner issues affecting the PNG LNG Project and the Hidden Valley Mining Project including other mines that will all be captured in a memorandum of agreement.

They have called for disclosure of pertinent information and engagement instead of limiting Morobe Provincial Government and the landowners to positions on Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, special support grants and cooperation and assistance to the State and the developer.

“As leaders and stakeholders, we need to have in-depth information and knowledge to formulate our positions on matters of equity, royalties, business development grants, employment and training, compensation payments and infrastructure developments.

“We also need to know the source and independent checks that formed the basis of the figures used in the financial model and benefits by Department of Treasury. Inclusion of future ore discovery prospects, its implications on mine life and related financial benefits,” the leaders said.

Governor Saonu has expressed further concern that the recent second Wafi-Golpu Mining Development Forum in Kokopo has sparked criticism from Morobeans and said that from now on all meetings will be held in either Lae or Morobe.

“If we hold meetings outside of Lae and or Morobe we will fuel unnecessary suspicions among Morobeans that we have things to hide.

“Mining Minister Johnson Tuke has already taken note of this matter and has told Mineral Resources Authority and the Department of Mineral Policy and Geohazards Management in Kokopo to take note and not hold Wafi Golpu Mining Project related meetings outside of Lae and Morobe,” he said.

The MPs have taken the strong stance that the MOA to be signed must be right, and that as stakeholders and host province they demand access to the draft mining development contract before it will be signed by the Head of State and developers.

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Wafi Landowners Slam Kokopo Meeting

Mine consultation meeting in East New Britain has left Wafi-Gulpu landowners feeling betrayed

Post Courier | August 13, 2018

The landowner group from Wafi-Golpu mine in Morobe Province has described the consultative meeting in Kokopo as political maneuvering.

Paramount chief and landowner for Babuaf tribe Ezra Kwako said such political maneuvering is a disgrace to the Wafi landowners.

Mr Kwako accused the meeting of being hijacked over to Kokopo, East New Britain Province between the government and the miner, Wafi Golpu JV.

He questioned why the sharing consultative meeting was moved to Kokopo and not held in Lae.

He said legitimate landowners were left out when the meeting was moved to Kokopo.

He said only a few of their “paper landowners” attended the Kokopo and have ill-documented the meeting as the representative of the tribe when the case was still before the National Court pending decision, which is soon to be handed down.

“We were not properly consulted and the meeting venue over to Kokopo was a denial for the better process when we are yet to identify the real legitimate landowners of Wafi mine development area,” Kwako said.

“We do not want to keep on making mistakes like that of the Hidden Valley Mining, enough is enough.

“Political interference to propagate better process is not to be entertained. Bring your discussion points to the village and let’s share with the people of mine affected areas. The MOA signing is one key document that will benefit the landowners and thus be very mindful of this current trend after all clan vetting process if fully completed.

“This is Morobe resource and we must discuss this issue amicably with well-informed dialog including the legitimate landowners in Morobe and not elsewhere,” Kwako said.

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Morobe opposes fly-in-fly-out for Wafi-Golpu mine workers

Wafi-Golpu joint venture mine.

The National aka The Loggers Times | 31 July 2018

THE Morobe government does not want “fly-in-fly-out” for workers for the Wafi-Golpu mine project, says Governor Ginson Saonu.

Saonu said the proposed Nadzab Airport City would cater for the accommodation of employees.

“We are prepared to share whatever land we have to make this happen,” he said.

“We cannot just talk about it. We have plans for accommodation and all facilities that are needed by the employees of the mine.”

Saonu said this when presenting Morobe’s five-year development plan to Planning Minister Richard Maru in Port Moresby yesterday.

Maru said the government would budget for land at Nadzab to be made available to the mining company.

“We would like all the families to be located there, housing estate to be located there and they can easily go up to the mine,” Maru said.

“We want to make sure that Nadzab has a city and supermarkets.

“We must look at water, sanitation and sewerage for the airport.

“We really must have a well-planned development around Nadzab.”

Maru said he had spoken to Lands Minister Justin Tkatchenko about putting a team together for Nadzab Airport City development.

“We are excited about the mine starting up,” he said. “Wafi-Golpu will be a game changer for Morobe.”

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Morobe government eyeing 20pc stake in Wafi-Golpu mine

Junior Ukaha | The National aka The Loggers Times | 16 July 2018

THE Morobe government wants an equity of no less than 20 per cent in the Wafi-Golpu Mine.

Governor Ginson Saonu made this known last Wednesday during a two-day stakeholder forum in Lae regarding development of the proposed mine.

He said the Morobe government wanted to be an active partner in mine development.

“Apart from the legislated 2 per cent royalties, my government and people need better and attractive incentives in the form of equity,” Saonu said.

“We have made our position clear and have requested the National Government to acquire extra equity on top of the 5 per cent free carry.

“We are prepared to assist the Government to acquire this equity ourselves. We expect no less than 20 per cent equity in the project.

“We want to be a major partner with the Wafi-Golpu Joint Venture in the construction and operation phase of the project.”

Saonu also asked the Government to uplift the curfew on the tax credit scheme (TCS) programme so that money could be used to fund infrastructure projects in mine-impacted communities.

“In this case, we request that over 50 per cent of the TCS be used in Morobe alone and a further 20 per cent to be used in the SML areas of landowners and impacted communities,” he said.

He said the Morobe government remained committed to see this project get off the ground during this term of government.

Saonu thanked the project area and pipeline landowners for giving their land for the project.

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Basil wants Wafi-Gulpu not to repeat Hidden Valley mistakes

“Are they [Harmony Gold and Newcrest Mining] willing to admit the mistakes they have done up at Hidden Valley?” – Minister Sam Basil

Junior Ukaha | The National aka The Loggers Times | 13 July 2018

BULOLO MP Sam Basil says he does not want to see a repeat of problems faced by landowners of the Hidden Valley Mine to happen at Wafi-Golpu.

The Mineral Resources Authority, however, countered that the fault was with the landowners themselves.

Basil was speaking yesterday during the second day of the Wafi-Golpu Project Development Forum in Lae.

Basil, whose district hosts Hidden Valley Mine, said despite the mine operating for a number of years, living standards of the mine-area landowners had not improved.

He said the Biangai and the Watut people, traditional landowners of Hidden Valley, had not seen any tangible developments and benefits from the mine.

“We have not fixed the problems of Hidden Valley and now we are talking about Wafi,” Basil said.

“These two same companies that have mined Hidden Valley now want to mine Wafi. Are they willing to admit the mistakes they have done up at Hidden Valley?

“Is the Mineral Resources Authority willing to shoulder the blame so that we can forge a new way forward?

“Our landowners in Biangai and Watut are still walking around without money.

“They have not been given much.”

Basil said there was also the issue of environmental damage at Hidden Valley, which is now before the courts.

He said the two per cent royalty given to mine landowners was not enough and should be increased to five per cent.

“Before you present this document to us, you have to tell us the failures of the past mines,” Basil said.

“MRA needs to outline them and find a way forward.

“The benefits of the past projects, you have to tell us now?

“What steps are we going to take from here on?”

Basil urged landowners not to quickly sign the mine memorandum of agreement (MoA) but ensure they understood how it would affect their lives and those of their children.

Sean Ngansia, MRA’s executive manager of development coordination, said the problem was not with the authority but the landowner leaders.

Ngansia said Basil was referring to how royalties from Hidden Valley had been managed.

“We don’t necessarily manage royalties on landowners’ behalf,” he said.

“It (royalties) is usually given directly to the landowners through their landowner associations.

“The issue now is really about how these monies are managed.

“You will find that in Hidden Valley and all the other mines, the landowner association leaders are not managing their royalties well.

“There’s a lot of misuse and mismanagement. These leaders also do not report to their people and that’s where the problem is.”

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PLANNED MINE PIPELINE THROUGH LAE UNDER ATTACK

“Minister Tuke welcomed these concerns and promised to have responsible agencies address them in the right processes, however  he called to have the mine agreement formalized before the November APEC meeting, a time frame which seems unreal given the outstanding issues of identifying other affected landowner groups and addressing their concerns”

Gabriel Lahoc | NBC News | 12 July 2018

The planned Wafi-Golpu mine pipeline, which will run out from the mine site from the borders of Bulolo and Huon Gulf districts, across the Markham river and ending in the industrial hub of Lae, has come under attack.

Leaders from the Ahi tribe, notably from Butibam village, and the Wafi-Golpu Mine Area Landowners Association, surprised the organisers and the guests when they interjected at the closing of the Wafi-Golpu mine project development forum yesterday at the Sir Ignatius Kilage stadium in Lae.

Chairman of the Wafi-Golpu Mine Area Landowners Association, Holmes Kissing, faced the guests, which included Mining Minister Johnson Tuke Morobe Governor Ginson Saonu, Communications and Energy Minister and Bulolo MP Sam Basil, Huon Gulf MP Ross Seymour, Menyamya MP Thomas Pelika, Tewai-Siassi MP Dr Kobby Bomareo, Mineral Resources Authority Executive Manager Sean Ngansia, Wafi-Golpu Joint Venture senior executives and the chairmen of the three primary landowners groups, Yanta, Hengambu and Babuaf, and expressed the people’s disappointment in their handling of the negotiations relating to the project.

This first ever forum is where all stakeholders were supposed to meet together and participate in discussions, but according to the frustated Ahi and other mine affected communities, not all stakeholder groups were ever consulted or invited to express themselves.

Mr Kissing, who is also from Butibam, shouted down the master of ceremony who was closing the first day open session, and was allowed by Minister Tuke, to air their grievances.

Mr Kissing, pointed out Morobe Deputy Provincial Administrator Masayat Moat, for failing in his leadership to get as many and all concerned parties together in the negotiations and discussions leading to the forum.

He told the national leaders and Wafi-Golpu JV executives that there were several outstanding issues as the planned pipeline will run through traditional land of several tribes and communities from outside and within Lae city and the fact that the state has not yet compensated the rightful landowners for the Lae Tidal Basin port and Lae city and that only one Ahi village of Wagang, where the pipe will end, was included as a stakeholder.

Reflecting on the mistakes of Hidden Valley mine, Mr Kissing warned that the livelihood of the people in and around the mine area, to those along the rivers and along the nearby coastline will be affected, and the frustrated locals will rise up against the developer and the government if they ignore these issues and concerns and sign any agreements and deals.

Mr Seymour and Mr Basil, admitted that the majority of the affected people are not yet ready for the mine and vowed to task the provincial administration to help identify affected communities and involve them, .

Minister Tuke welcomed these concerns and promised to have responsible agencies address them in the right processes, however in his speech he called to have the mine agreement formalized before the November APEC meeting, a time frame which seems unreal given the outstanding issues of identifying other affected landowner groups and addressing their concerns.

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