Tag Archives: Kalia Ltd

PNG miners to present in Sydney

Drilling at Edie Creek

RAPID-FIRE presentations by four companies with interests in Papua New Guinea will be delivered in Australia on Thursday at the inaugural ResourceStocks Sydney conference.

PNG Industry News | 14 May 2018

Kingston Resources is first up at 11.45am, followed by Geopacific Resources, Kalia and Niuminco Group. Each company has a 15-minute slot at the event, which is to be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre over two days, May 16 and 17.

• Kingston Resources has the advanced exploration Misima gold project which has 2.8 million ounce resource which Kingston aims increase. Misima Island is 625km east of Port Moresby in the Solomon Sea and was operated as an open pit gold mine from 1989 to 2004, producing 3.7Moz gold at an average cost of $218/oz. Kingston owns 49% of Misima and is earning in to 70% and the joint venture partner PPC, is owned by JX Nippon Metals and Mining (66%), and Mitsui Mining and Smelting (34%).

• Geopacific Resources has the advanced exploration Woodlark Island gold project in Milne Bay Province. Geopacific recently released a prefeasibility study on the project which indicated that Woodlark has the potential to be a robust, low-cost, low-stripping ratio open pit operation that can deliver an average of 100,000 ounces of gold per annum over 10 years. Highlights of the study include: an initial head grade of 1.63 grams per tonne gold; an all-in sustaining cost of $A990 per ounce for the first five years and $A1110/oz over the life of mine; capital cost of $A180 million; and a reserve of 34.7 million tonnes at 0.99gpt gold containing more than 1.1 million ounces.

• Kalia describes itself as an exploration company targeting energy metals across a range of mineralisation styles – and one of the company’s areas of interest is Bougainville Island. Kalia says that from the preliminary work completed, including the re-processing of the data collected in 1986 by Fathom Geophysics and the analysis of raw data from other studies, sufficient sites have been identified to begin exploration. 

• Niuminco Group has the brownfields Edie Creek gold project in Morobe Province 120km south of Lae. The mining leases cover nearly four square kilometres and lie in a valley between high slopes. Since becoming involved in the Edie Creek project, Niuminco has upgraded existing buildings and power supplies and constructed service roads in the lease area. Edie Creek ore is currently being processed at an average 15.0 tonnes per day – an increase from the previous 12 month averages of 6.4tpd. With new infrastructure purchased, it is anticipated Edie Creek will scale up to run at more than 40tpd – a three-times increase over recent production rates (13 to 15tpd).

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Bougainville imposes moratorium on Panguna mine over fears of civil unrest

The Panguna mine, located in the east of Papua New Guinea in the Autonomous Region of Bougainville, was at the centre of Bougainville’s decade-long civil war.

In dramatic policy turnaround, government determines people feel Bougainville Copper Limited doesn’t deserve a social licence to run the controversial mine

Helen Davidson | The Guardian | 10 January 2018

The Bougainville government has enacted an indefinite moratorium on renewing the licence of a controversial mining company over fears it could reignite violent civil conflict.

In December Bougainville landowner groups were called to vote on allowing Bougainville Copper Limited (BCL) to renew their mining licence and potentially reopen the Panguna mine, but the vote was split.

“If we went ahead now, you could be causing a total explosion of the situation again,” the Bougainville Autonomous Government (ABG) president, John Momis, told the ABC on Monday.

The Panguna copper mine was central to the civil war and blockade in the 1990s that killed tens of thousands of people. Conflict escalated after landowners protested environmental damage by the mine and the lack of economic benefit for local people.

The Rio Tinto-owned BCL was forced to close the mine, and discussion in recent years about reopening it has sparked hostilities in the nearby communities.

In June protesters blocked Momis and other political leaders from accessing Panguna to sign an agreement with landowners, which the ABC reported would have opened the way for BCL to work towards returning.

Legislation passed in 2015 gave traditional landowners greater ownership over resources as well as powers over the establishment or reopening of mines, but confusion and division remains.

At the time of the BCL vote local journalist Aloysius Laukai reported Momis said mining by any company would be “untenable” under the circumstances. However on Monday Momis told the ABC the moratorium only strictly applied to BCL, not other potential operators.

The moratorium is a dramatic turnaround in policy from the ABG, which determined people felt BCL didn’t deserve a social licence to run the mine.

The ABG owns a 36.4% share in BCL, and has consistently said reopening Panguna was essential for the island’s economic self-sufficiency if it is to become independent.

Luke Fletcher, the executive director of an Australian-based NGO, Jubilee, said it wasn’t clear if the turnaround was “a temporary retreat or a permanent change of direction”.

“It could be they’re just biding their time for another couple of years, or they’re considering opening Panguna with other operators,” Fletcher said. “It does seem the intention is still to reopen the mine.”

The Papua New Guinea government is the only other major shareholder after Rio Tinto left in 2016. It has said it will give its 17% share to Bougainville, making the ABG majority shareholders of a company that has just one project – a mine over which the ABG has now placed a moratorium.

BCL is yet to be officially informed of the moratorium, but learned of it through media reports.

The company’s Port Moresby general manager, Mark Hitchcock, said it had sought further clarity, as it still “firmly believed” it had strong support among landowners.

“Hitchcock said previously held community forums led by the ABG had also demonstrated strong majority support and this reflected the company’s own experiences on the ground,” a spokesman told Guardian Australia.

“He stressed that BCL was a local company majority owned by the people of PNG, including Bougainville and had always acted in good faith after being invited to enter a new process for the redevelopment of Panguna by the ABG and landowners.”

BCL claimed it had support from eight of the nine landholder groups, as well as the Special Mining Lease Osikaiyang Landowners Association. It said minority elements – and competing mining interests – were disrupting consensus.

There were disputes with the association’s chair, Philip Miriori, BCL said, citing a letter from 367 authorised customary heads who disputed Momis’s characterisation of the vote as a “narrow divide”.

The customary heads told PNG’s Post Courier the meeting was given a submission signed by 320 of the heads giving their support to BCL.

As the resource-rich country moves on from civil war and towards independence, it is increasingly looking to mining for its economic future.

West Australian company Kalia Ltd recently announced it had signed a land access agreement with north Bougainville landowners, allowing the start of a “full-scale exploration program”.

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