Tag Archives: Lawrence Daveona

‘Bougainville won’t fall for more false claims from BCL’

Photo: Catherine Wilson/IPS

Philip Miriori (Chairman) and Lawrence Daveona (Ex Chairman) SMLOLA | 4 June 2018

HOW CAN BOUGAINVILLE COPPER LIMITED BELIEVE WE AND OUR AUTONOMOUS BOUGAINVILLE GOVERNMENT WILL FALL FOR MORE OF THEIR FALSE CLAIMS OF RESPECT FOR BOUGAINVILLE AND ITS PEOPLE?

Bougainville Copper Limited (“BCL”) continues to insult and disrespect Bougainville: the Panguna Customary Landowners by the recent statements made by BCL’s Chairman, Mr Mel Togolo and the ABG by their treatment at their Annual General Meeting blocking their vote.

Why did BCL not work with the ABG in advance to ensure they could have their say at the meeting if they are genuinely trying to mend fences with Bougainville and lose their mantle of being a PNG controlled company?” asked Mr Philip Miriori, the Chairman of the Special Mining Lease Osikaiyang Landowners Association (“SMLOLA”).

Mr Miriori said “we know the new BCL Chairman has his trainer wheels on, but this is unbelievable! How many world class mines has he developed? Wasn’t he the guy who sat on the Rio controlled BCL Board in the bad old days – for 6 or 7 years? Isn’t he the PNG country manager for the environmentally controversial deep sea mining start up, Nautilus Minerals? Why would we want any of that?”

Then there is the false attempt to blame third parties for the opposition by the Panguna Customary Landowners: this reflects the continuing failure on the part of BCL to even acknowledge the historic environmental havoc wreaked on the Panguna Land by BCL and the role of BCL in the devastating conflict in Bougainville. “Do they think we have forgotten or forgiven – no never” says Mr Miriori.

Mr Miriori, says “The failure of BCL’s Chairman, Mr Togolo, to acknowledge the historic wrongs committed against the people of Bougainville is totally unacceptable. The wilful blindness of BCL, its failure to admit its role in causing the environmental devastation to our land and its failure to rehabilitate or provide compensation for the damage, condemns BCL from ever obtaining SMLOLA’s approval or support. Trying to blame third parties for this is both naïve and arrogant – it is a flimsy and dishonest attempt to divert attention from their failure to win any aspect of social licence to return to Bougainville. That is and will always be the problem.”

Mr Miriori said “it is simple, BCL has one of the worst environmental and social impact records in the world and has not been welcome to return to Panguna in 30 years – yet they claim strong Landowner support. Just more lies!”

Prominent SMLOLA member Mr Lawrence Daveona supported Mr Miriori’s comments saying “BCL’s operations at the Panguna Mine were the cause of the devastating conflict on Bougainville. That is why they have been unwelcome in Bougainville for the last 30 years. It was the height of arrogance to think they could win community support without any reconciliation. They have ignored us and tried to go around “the impediments” – the owners of the minerals and have tried to simply pull political strings. The recent BCL attempt to curry favour and scramble to regain tenure to their old mine has been a disaster, just like their treatment of our lands and people – after 30 years of neglect and arrogance, how surprising!”

Mr Daveona said “our President Momis summed it up perfectly when he said BCL did not deserve the renewal because their attitudes to Landowners had not changed from the past.”

Mr Miriori spelt out what he said “were obvious facts:

  • BCL has achieved no reconciliation with the Customary Landowners for 30 years;
  • BCL has not attempted discussions with the current Court sanctioned SMLOLA Chairman and Executive even once; 
  • BCL has failed to acknowledge its role in Bougainville’s tragic history;
  • BCL has offered no compensation for the environmental and social impact of BCL’s massive profit taking operations at the Panguna Mine;
  • BCL has offered no assistance to rebuild Bougainville post resolution of the conflict; 
  • BCL has undertaken no remedial action to address the massive environmental damage from its past operations; and
  • BCL has made no attempt to identify the needs of the Customary Landowners and engage with the community.;

Mr Miriori said “it was outrageous that BCL untruthfully claimed it held unanimous Landowner consent when there was an existing petition with more than 2,000 SMLOLA members rejecting BCL’s return to Panguna. BCL has insulted the Customary Landowners by referring to them as ‘impediments to be removed’ and more recently, ‘disruptive influences’. This shows a contempt for the rights of Customary Landowners and the people.

Mr Miriori said “how could they have been surprised – they have never had majority Landowner support. Have they forgotten their 30 year history of devastation they never seem to mention now?”

Mr Daveona supported the ABG’s decision saying “BCL had an EL for two years from 2014 to 2016 and even had a further 15 months after the expiry of EL 1 and still they could not win Landowner support. The refusal of that application has been very positive for the Landowners and allowed us to bring an end to the social disharmony their false claims caused and to build an even stronger opposition to their return. The Landowners are now fully united against BCL. BCL should leave and respect the wishes of Landowners.”

President Dr John Momis of the ABG stated on 8 January 2018, in a public interview with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, that the BCL Application had been denied by the ABG because of the Panguna legacy Issues and consequently the inability of BCL to gain a social licence. He observed BCL’s attitude towards Customary Landowners had not changed and therefore that BCL did not deserve an extension. It was noted that at the Warden’s Hearing in December 2017 almost all those who spoke referred to these significant and continuing legacy issues and the need for BCL to pay compensation.

President Momis was entirely correct in his observation and the recent statements by BCL’s Chairman show a contempt not only for the Customary Landowners but also for the ABG itself.

Mr Miriori agreed saying “BCL was the tenement holder during the time which systemic damage to the environment and river systems occurred. The Panguna mine was at the centre of the conflict.” It is reported 20,000 Bougainvillean people died in this conflict. This is the incontrovertible factual truth of BCL’s legacy.

These events are of global significance and to this day are fundamental to the vast majority of the Panguna Customary Landowners and Bougainvilleans opposing BCL’s return.

BCL made a formal decision to not acknowledge responsibility, to not say ‘sorry’ and to not pay any fair compensation for these events and the massive damage. These deliberate commercial decisions (to save BCL money and to not acknowledge its past wrongdoings) are fatal to BCL’s attempt to return to Panguna.”

As the highly respected community leader, Mr Sam Kauona said at the Warden’s Hearing, BCL can never be allowed to return to Panguna. The petition opposing BCL’s return has more than 2,000 supporters. The majority of those attending and speaking at the independent Warden’s Hearing in December 2017 opposed BCL’s return.

The continued failure to have regard to the opinion of the Customary Landowners, Mr Miriori says, “shows an arrogance and on-going disrespect.” He powerfully criticises BCL’s attempt to divert the blame from its own conduct “This arrogance and ongoing disrespect of the Landowners’ clear wishes perpetuates the tragic legacy of BCL/Rio, and with every day that passes, further compounds and entrenches the opposition of the overwhelming majority of Panguna Landowners to BCL. Let us now look forward not backward to a new deal for Bougainville. BCL is finished. Its attempt to cause even further delays to the successful redevelopment and reopening of the mine blocks and delays employment opportunities, the funding of critically needed community programs and obtaining of financial benefits for all Bougainvilleans.”

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Environmental impact, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Landowners disappointed with BCL

PNG Loop | April 29, 2018

The Special Mine Lease Osikaiyang Landowners Association Inc has expressed disappointment with Bougainville Copper Ltd’s conduct.

In a statement, SMLOLA chairman, Philip Miriori, and his advisor Lawrence Daveona say BCL has shown that they have not changed or learnt any lessons “from the tragic history they put us through”.

“The Warden’s Hearing could not have been a stronger message from our community – BCL is not welcome at Panguna ever, yet they try and say they have majority landowner support.

“Respect the call of the people and the Government and leave.

“The decision of the ABG to deny their purported renewal application has been incredibly positive for our landowners, allowing the real facts to come to light and getting rid of the menace that was trying to divide our people. We are now united behind a fresh new development of Panguna with our preferred developer, RTG Mining Inc. and want nothing to do with BCL again.”

The following comments are in response to the 2017 Annual Report of BCL which was released to the Australian Stock Exchange recently.

Miriori says for a company that:

  • Has been given almost 30 years to fix up their failings of the past with no progress;
  • Accepted a further 2 year exploration licence under the very Bougainville Mining Act they now conveniently say is illegal;
  • Sought a renewal of the exploration licence under the very Bougainville Mining Act they now conveniently say is illegal;
  • Were given a further 18 months after the expiry of their 2 year exploration licence to secure landowner support and still failed throughout that 3 and half year period to overcome or even acknowledge the legacy issues and win landowner support;
  • Attended a Warden’s Hearing under the very Bougainville Mining Act they now conveniently say is illegal and failed;

They now try and cry wolf saying they have been treated unfairly and actually have strong landowner support despite the obvious facts. How naïve do they think the landowners and the ABG are?

Daveona says:

“I know BCL well, I sadly supported them for 34 years till 2017 but I have now seen the truth.

“My fellow SMLOLA members are now all united against the return of BCL at any time. We will not be taken advantage of again. Even if they tried to finally step up and listen to us and compensate us for the past, it is too late, we cannot trust them. Too many broken promises.”

Miriori adds:

“The Annual Report accuses the ABG of expropriating BCL’s Panguna mine assets in breach of the Bougainville Copper Agreement Act 1967; the same Bougainville Mining Act that they were happy to take advantage of and use to prolong their involvement in Panguna.

“They also say the ABG has no legal powers in respect to mining on Bougainville and that the ABG has now illegally expropriated its mine. Could there be any greater show of disrespect for our ABG and Bougainville at large?”

The landowners have made their choice on the redevelopment of Panguna and are committed to working with the ABG to implement a successful new mine that will benefit all Bougainvilleans.

1 Comment

Filed under Human rights, Papua New Guinea

No Road to Damascus Conversion for President Momis

President Momis is still pressing ahead with Panguna reopening despite turning his back on BCL

As predicted, the Momis government has not had a Road to Damascus conversion, where they promise to honour the wishes and customs of landowning communities. All banks should be scrutinising very closely the accounts of senior ABG officials, and their relatives, for large unexplained deposits which may help explain BCL’s abrupt eviction – it might also be the quickest route to finding out who the ‘new’ proposed operator is for Panguna, who has the consent of ‘all’ the landowning community. Of course, whoever it is, they will be a low flying organisation, with offshore bank accounts and companies. 

So here is how its going to work. BCL is now kicked out. The politicians have shown they listen to the voice of the people (yeah right). A new operator will be announced. There will be a ‘groundswell’ of local support for this operators (lies, of course). The usual local faces will be put forwards as the voice of the people – Mirorio, Daveona, etc. They aren’t. No other voices will be allowed to be heard. There will need to be a big financial backer. Because of the conflict, and the fact the ABG has suddenly cut and run from BCL, after promising them the world since 2010, it will only come from high-risk investors. Probably China. Whatever agreement is reached, percentages will be paid to politicians, and subcontracts promised to their family and friends. If the Chinese are the funders, expect a large influx of Chinese labour, and tax breaks galore.

But there will be resistance. Big time. The struggle continues.

Meet To Re-Open Panguna Mine Successfully

Sebastian Hakalits | Post Courier | January 28, 2018

A recent meeting between the chairman of the Special Mining Lease Osikaiyang Landowners Association (SMLOLA) Philip Miriori and the President of ABG Dr John Momis in Buka in January was described as a success.
It was jointly agreed that the technical team of the SMLOLA would re-engage with the ABG Mining Department to develop a plan.
Mr Miriori said following the recent rejection of Bougainville Copper Limited’s plans to redevelop Panguna by the Bougainville Executive Council, and president Momis’s press release of December 22, 2017 that he wants to work more closely with the landowners to find an acceptable redevelopment proposal for Panguna that will be widely supported by Bougainvilleans and unite the landowners. “We were very appreciative of President Momis’s offer to meet to start this process,” Miriori said.
Mining Minister and vice president of Bougainville, Raymond Masono was also present at the meeting along with Finance Minister Robin Wilson and ABG Police Minister William Masiu.
Mr Miriori said they had a successful meeting with President Momis and ‘‘the other ministers and I confirm it is my intention as the chairman of the SMLOLA to engage meaningfully with the ABG and National Government in finding a way forward for the future prosperity of all Bougainvilleans.’’
‘‘Mr Momis was very respectful of my position and was appreciative of the reconciliation we have been able to achieve on the leadership issues.
He said we all understand that the redevelopment of Panguna, if done with the support of the community, could enable Bougainville to thrive and enhance the Independence Referendum plans, which the ABG committed to in the recent joint supervisory body meeting in Port Moresby.
Mr Miriori said this week he and his brother Lawrence Daveona, the former Chairman will commence their awareness campaign throughout the Panguna area to update their members on their meeting with President and will report back to Momis before the end of the month with their findings.
He said meanwhile, their technical team will be meeting with the ABG Department of Minerals and Energy this week.
“We believe this could be the turning point for our Bougainville and look forward to working with the ABG as one team to progress the redevelopment plans at Panguna,” said Miriori.

3 Comments

Filed under Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Court Orders Panguna Mine Mediation To Continue

Post Courier | December 19, 2017

Mediation over the leadership of the Special Mining Lease Osikaiyang Landowners Association (SMLOLA) in Panguna, Bougainville is continuing following directions from National Court Judge Andrew Kandakasi.
The matter returned to court on December 8, and adjourned to Tuesday this week where Justice Kandakasi ordered the mediation process continue.
His orders are in relation to the current leadership tussle between Philip Miriori and Lawrence Daveona claiming chairmanship of SMLOLA.
Legal action was then sought to determine whether or not the reconciliation between Mr Miriori and Mr Daveona had been resolved to the satisfaction of the broader SMLOLA membership.
According to Bougainville Copper Limited’s company secretary Mark Hitchcock following three earlier mediation sessions, a fourth has now been scheduled for January 29, 2018 before the matter returns to court on February 6, 2018.
Mr Hitchcock said it was misleading for rival exploration companies to claim the matter had been resolved when the process was still in progress.

1 Comment

Filed under Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Bougainville Vice President warns Panguna Landowners

The abandoned Panguna mine pit, as it is today. Photo by Catherine Wilson.

DO NOT MEDDLE WITH PANGUNA SAYS MASONO

By Aloysius Laukai | New Dawn | 6 December 2017

ABG Vice President and Minister for Mining, RAYMOND MASONO is calling on Panguna leaders, PHILIP MIRIORI and LAWRENCE DAVEONA to know that the Panguna mine is no ordinary mine.

He said that the Panguna mine has a bad history that has crippled the economy of PNG and Bougainville and with many lives lost fighting for it.

The Vice President said that the Panguna mine no longer belongs to the landowners because Bougainvilleans blood were spilt over that particular mine.

He said that whilst the resources in Panguna and other parts of Bougainville might belong to the people, the ABG has a responsibility to protect its people from unscrupulous companies whose sole interest is to exploit our people for their own economic interests.

The Vice President said that we have seen how Bougainvilleans were exploited by foreigners since colonial days and the ABG does not want a repeat of the past.

He said that he was surprised that certain individuals can so easily sell their birth right for as little as FOURTY THOUSAND KINA a month to a foreign company when foreign exploitation was one of the issues against which our people fought and died.

Also the ABG rejects companies that think they can bribe their way into the people’s resources by giving certain individuals money to gain landowner consent.

PANGUNA WILL BE DEVELOPED SAYS VICE PRESIDENT

The ABG Vice President and Mining Minister, RAYMOND MASONO says that the PANGUNA MINE in Central Bougainville will be re-developed under the Bougainville Mining Act 2015 and by a developer or developers who respect the Autonomous Bougainville Government and its laws.

In a press statement, MR. MASONO said that the developer must also come through the main door.

MR. MASONO made these remarks when commenting on a statement by RTG of a deal supposedly made between MR. PHILIP MIRIORI and LAWRENCE DAVEONA to support RTG to develop the PANGUNA mine.

He said that it seems ironic that two people who were fighting over the leadership of the Osikayang Landowners Association in court, a mediation case which is still the subject of a court decision can suddenly reconcile to support a company that does not respect the legitimate government and its mining laws.

The Vice President said that the ABG, the landowners and the people of Bougainville will not entertain companies who use the back door or break and enter through the window using self-centred individuals who think that they have a monopoly over the people’s resources or represent their interests.

He said that the landowners will decide who the preferred developer would be through a transparent process undertaken by the ABG Department of Minerals and Energy Resources currently underway.

MR. MASONO said that the process has not yet been exhausted and any deals supposedly made between landowner leaders,companies,or the National Government and in particular RTG are premature at this stage.

Leave a comment

Filed under Financial returns, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Formal Reconciliation of Mr Philip Miriori and Mr Lawrence Daveona

Press Release | The Special Mining Lease Osikaiyang Landowners Association | 5 December 2017

Mr Philip Miriori, the Chairman of the Special Mining Lease Osikaiyang Landowners Association (“SMLOLA”) and Mr Lawrence Daveona are pleased to report to all members, that following a customary reconciliation process, both men as leaders in Panguna have reconciled and are keen to build unity amongst all members to support the initiatives of the Chairman, Mr Philip Miriori.

Both Mr Miriori and Mr Daveona are appreciative of the mediation process led by the Honourable Judge Kandakasi over recent months and believe it was instrumental in allowing both men to better understand the merits of their respective views. They have now agreed to work together, co­operatively, towards a redevelopment of Panguna. Mr Daveona now has a better appreciation of the deal delivered by the SMLOLA Executive with RTG Mining Inc., which they have worked hard on for more than 18 months and is keen to be a part of the process to professionally and sensitively redevelop Panguna so that all the SMLOLA members, all Bougainvilleans and the Autonomous Bougainville Government (“ABG”) are winners in this historic process.

Both Mr Miriori and Mr Daveona will work co-operatively with both the ABG and the National Government and call on both Governments to respect the wishes of the landowners.

It is recognised that there is still much to be done, including an extensive awareness program among the members, to ensure that all understand the care being taken to respect and treat fairly all Bougainvilleans this time around, while also working with a partner to ensure the highest of environmental standards. Both Mr Miriori and Mr Daveona are confident they can work well together and undertake to work tirelessly to protect the member’s rights as owners of the minerals at Panguna and ensure any redevelopment of Panguna is with the partner of their choice.

1 Comment

Filed under Mine construction, Papua New Guinea

Meetings to determine Panguna’s future

Cedric Patjole | PNG Loop | November 11, 2017

Two meetings have been identified as key events that may determine the timeline to rebuild the Panguna Mine in the Autonomous Region of Bougainville.

According to Business Advantage, Bougainville Copper Limited (BCL) chairman, Rob Burns, says the meetings, to be held in November and December, include a mediation as well as a wardens’ hearing.

The first meeting on November 23 and 24 is the third round of mediation talks to settle a dispute over the chairmanship of the Special Mining Lease Osikaiyang Landowners Association (SMLOLA).

SMLOLA is one of the nine landowner associations in the project area.

A dissident landowner, Philip Miriori, is at the centre of the dispute, along with his cousin Lawrence Daveona, who both lay claim to the chairmanship.

The second event on December 11 and 12 is the wardens’ hearings on the five-year renewal of the mining exploration lease, currently held by BCL.

Under the Bougainville Mining Act 2015, the Autonomous Bougainville Government needs to hold wardens’ hearings as part of the process for a five-year renewal of the lease, before recommendations then go to the Minister.

“I’m optimistic it will be renewed. The landowners have agreed because they want a better life and see this as the way forward,” says Burns.

The timeline for building the mine is estimated to cost K12 to K18 billion, and could take up to 10 years.

Leave a comment

Filed under Exploration, Financial returns, Mine construction, Papua New Guinea