Tag Archives: MRA

Taking the Initiative – Engan man builds home made Gold Crusher

Vasinatta Yama | EMTV News | 13 May 2019

Joe Tomerop from the Enga province is an Alluvial Gold miner who has taken the bold steps in increasing mining production in his area.

Almost two years in the making, Tomerop has completed his own home-made gold crusher and is having it ready for transportation to the Kompiam district for an alluvial mine at his village.

Costing a Million Kina he says, he was challenged by the Mineral Resources Authority to have the mining capacity available before acquiring a mining license for the alluvial deposits in his mothers village in the province.

Tomerop who is a local business man says he used his own resources to build the machines proving that local Papua New Guineans have the capacity to do mining and export, and have the licenses to do so.

“I want MRA and Papua New Guinea sees that Papua New Guineans we can do it. That’s the difference. So we have completed it and I’m waiting for my license.”

An alluvial miner, in 2014, he discovered alluvial gold in his mother’s area, who’s landowners are the Kuralin tribe of Kompiam.

With agreements from his uncles, he took the initiative and brought the Warden Hearing to Kompiam.

“From that time on we followed MRA’s procedures and surveyed the area and gather landowners. We are nine clans from the Kuralin Tribe from that mountain. So we tried doing it and brought the Warden’s hearing and the Warden gave okay for us.”

The crusher he’s designed is built using local knowledge, and utilized the help of an Australian friend who guided the locals to complete building the gold crusher.

“It’s for alluvial gold. We did not bring it from China, Europe or Australia. This machine is locally built.  Few things like pipes and pumps are not in PNG so we brought it from Australia.”

According to Mineral Resources Authority, panning for alluvial gold mine can bring an estimated K300 million into the PNG economy, and Tomerop believes that with his crusher and machines, he can triple his own revenue as a result.

“But I don’t think a National has come to that capacity of what I had in mind. Because it’s hard to invest money in something you don’t know whether there’s something under the ground or not. You know that coffee season is good, the soil is good, and then you plant coffee because you know the market is there. This one has market but to start it is difficult so I took a gamble.”

Tomerop is now waiting for MRA to grant him and his tribesman their license to operate the alluvial mine.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Financial returns, Mine construction, Papua New Guinea

MRA Assures Wafi-Golpu Landowners Of Best Deal

WHY SHOULD WE BELIEVE YOU THIS TIME Mr GARRY?

MRA HAS FAILED THE LANDOWNERS AND PROVINCIAL GOVTS IN EVERY OTHER MINING DEAL IT HAS AGREED.

WHY AND HOW IS ANYTHING GOING TO BE DIFFERENT THIS TIME?

Post Courier | May 7, 2019

The Mineral Resources Authority’s (MRA) Managing Director Jerry Garry has assured the landowners of the Wafi Golpu project, and the Morobe Provincial Government that the MRA would ensure they get the best deal out of the project.

Mr Garry said this in light of the presentation of the position paper, by the Morobe Provincial Government (MPG), to his office last week Friday.

The paper was presented by the MPG administrator Bart Ipambonj who said the MPG’s position reflected the wishes, dreams and aspirations of Morobeans.

A position paper is a benefit sharing proposal, which individual stakeholders of mining projects propose to be tabled at an MoA negotiations forum.

“The national government will ensure that landowners and the province would get the best deal out of the project.

“This is the spirit in which the government will be moving into the MoA negotiation forum.

The MRA will do everything in its powers to ensure that all stakeholders are heard and no one is left behind in the negotiations.

“Everybody is important to the MoA process including the developer,” he said.

The other stakeholders who have submitted their position papers are the Wampar and Mumeng LLGs, the Special Mining Lease Landowners Associations of Hengambu, Yanta and Babuaf, and Deep Sea

Tailings Pipeline (DSTP) Association. Wampar Pipeline and Butibam Associations are yet to submit their papers to the state.

After all position papers are received, the MRA will consult relevant government agencies and stage another series of negotiations with all stakeholders under the ongoing development forum.
This is to ensure benefits are properly negotiated.

This process will gradually lead to the MOA for the benefit sharing arrangements of the mega-Wafi – Golpu Project.

Mr Garry said the block-cave mining method proposed for Wafi-Golpu proposed by the developer Newcrest Mining, is the first for PNG.

Newcrest is one of the leading experts in this mining method, given they have a very good track record with their deepest (1.2 km deep) panel cave mining in Cadia East, NSW, Australia.

The MD said given the narrow vertical geometry of the mine, Block-Caving is the only possible mining method.

The MD said he has every confidence in the joint venture partners to deliver the mining project successfully.

Mr Garry assured Newcrest that the government would work with the company and other stakeholders to achieve a win-win for all parties.

Leave a comment

Filed under Corruption, Financial returns, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Sinivit Landowners Call For Audit Into Mine Operations

Post Courier | March 19, 2019

The Sinivit Mine Landowners Association is calling on the East New Britain provincial government to fund an independent audit into the operations of the abandoned Sinivit gold mine.

The developer, New Guinea Gold Limited abandoned the project in September 2014 after blaming the government and the Mineral Resources Authority for not quickly renewing their mining licence.

It is understood MRA had notified the company to return and rectify safety and environmental issues related to the Sinivit project but this has not eventuated.

Chairman Douglas Augustine said a submission was given to the provincial government in August last year requesting an independent audit to be conducted on the mine.

He said before any mining project can be re-opened, an audit must be done to establish how much was generated by the mining operations in the past and who benefited from those funds.

Mr Augustine said currently there is an environmental issue where some of the 29 abandoned vats used to extract gold and other minerals at the mine site were further damaged by heavy rain and flooding, with potential chemical contamination into nearby rivers of Warangoi and Nengmutka.

“Right now most of those vats near the cliff have collapsed and I appeal to communities near the two rivers not to use it too much as it is not safe,” he said.

Therefore he urged the provincial government and its administration to fast track an investigation or audit, so that any such issues are addressed before the mining project can be re-opened.

The landowners say they are not against the planned re-opening of the mine, but want an audit and report to be tabled first before the mine can be re-opened.

The office of the ENB Governor in response said the Minister for Mining will officially visit the mine soon to determine the next course of action.

2 Comments

Filed under Environmental impact, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Gold is Stolen on a Massive Scale in PNG

Sam Jay Kaupa | PNG Blogs | 

There is a question that people need to ask. Why can’t the Central Bank of PNG buy gold to curb smuggling and also build the reserves to stabilise the plummeting Kina?

The mining sector accounts for about 9% of the GDP and the overall resources sector contributes about 26% of the GDP. This will continue to rise with the current demand for cobalt which as a by-product of the mix hydroxide precipitate from the Ramu Nickel.

Copper is on the rebound with nickel and so is gold which is now hovering above $US1,300/oz. Gold price will continue to go up according to analysts and from graphical representations from Kitco (where I get most of my data from)

Currently, gold is stolen on a massive scale in PNG Mines. Gold production from mines is under-reported. This is a massive scam. For example – 20 million ounces were mined from the giant Porgera Gold Mine and bullions shipped off-shore by helicopter to Mt Hagen and by private jet to Perth almost every few days over the last two and a half decades.

Who from the IRC, Customs, Treasury or the MRA checks the exact amount of gold that is shipped out?

NO ONE – I MEAN NO ONE.

The MRA gets a little piece of paper called Form 25 where minerals exported are recorded from the Registered Mine Manager (who are all expats for the big mines)

That information is not enough. It is criminal to accept as gospel unverifiable sales records, especially for gold shipments.

Then the Treasury department relies of this MRA record of sales to project future revenues and plug that into the budget. The same info is shared with the BoPNG and other agencies.

For God’s heavenly grace – why can’t we have some of these fat lazy public servants at the point of exits like the helipad in Porgera to physically weigh, record and sign off on all gold shipments? Guess we caught the late bus. Tough luck now. 20 million ounces out the back door.

The other mines like Lihir and Ramu Nickel are doing the same thing. The PNG government does not have people on the ground like what I used to see everywhere in Africa where I used to work. They are everywhere. They are everywhere because that’s where the money comes in from. It’s not rocket science. You don’t collect revenue for the government by sitting in air-conditioned offices and pray for God’s interventions? Get your fat bums out and get your smooth fingers dirty.

So the bottom line is gold is stolen everywhere. It’s prevalent.

Why on earth does the BoPNG even give licences for companies to export gold?

“Bank of PNG should buy the gold instead and put the money there (in gold) instead of reserving the dollars alone. They should reserve dollars and gold together to stabilise the Kina starting with the artisanal gold market.

As an example, the Tanzanian government has a prolonged spat with Barrick fully owned subsidiary Acacia over a $190 billion tax bill for its mining operations in the East African nation. Exactly the same thing they were doing in Porgera until the Government found out and back-calculated the tax owed to them. So what I’m saying here is doable if the PNG government is serious in recouping lost revenue.

In 2017, that government passed laws to reform their mining sector that the industry complained would be costly and onerous.

In PNG when such laws are proposed, the industry backed by the PNG Chamber of Mines bitterly contests because they want PNG to continue to become an impoverished nation. And this is strongly supported by PNG government agencies (you know who they are).

But I tell you, one day, one friggin day this will change and the people of PNG will take back their resources and develop it with decent developers so that the benefits will trickle down right to the doorsteps of the people whose faint cries are always ignored by greedy people.

Don’t mess with God’s people. One day they will rise and the stealing will cease.

3 Comments

Filed under Financial returns, Papua New Guinea

A Small Scale Miner sees Alluvial Mining as PNG’s Future

Vasinatta Yama | EMTV News | 22 November 2018

A small scale miner and local businessman, Joe Tomerop says Papua New Guinea will have a bright future, if the government sees the importance of alluvial mining.

Tomerop, who has been in the business for five years, says small scale mining can rescue a country’s economy and foreign exchange.

However, Tomerop says he still needs a license to operate as a first time local investor in this sector.

Tomerop is building his own machines and plant to fulfil the Mineral Resource Authority’s requirement for investors to have their own equipment before applying for license.

So far, he has spent over K800, 000 to locally build his own plant, as well as trying to acquire a license from the Mineral Resources Authority.

Tomerop’s village in the Kompiam electorate in Enga Province is situated on the beltline of resources such as gold and copper.

Tomerop says he wants to be one of the first Papua New Guineans to own a small scale mine, instead of working for expatriates.

Joe Tomerop has been in business for over 30 years, and has only just started investing in small scale alluvial mining.

In 2016, EMTV’s Resource PNG Program featured a story about an alluvial mining conference and tradeshow hosted by the Mineral Resource Authority in Goroka.

The theme was “Mechanised Alluvial Mining” from which Tomerop also attended.

Tomerop was not pleased that MRA did not tradeshow any mechanised equipment to small scale miners to learn from.

This has forced him to build his own equipment to be able to get a license.

A landowner group from Tomerop’s village has always wanted to mine gold illegally, but they said alluvial mining has the potential to bring in millions of kina.

They are urging MRA to be fair in issuing licenses to expatriates as well as the locals.

Leave a comment

Filed under Financial returns, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Unauthorised Miners To Be Fined

Post Courier | September 27, 2018

The Mineral Resources Authority has started ridding unauthorized semi mechanized or mechanized mining in the country.

Unauthorized alluvial mining is predominant in the Wau and Bulolo areas of Morobe Province.

Illegal alluvial miners face a fine of up to K10,000 or prison term of up to four years.

Recently MRA issued 13 stop work notices to individuals engaged in the illegal activities in Wau and Bulolo.

MRA stated such activities are not only illegal but pose substantial environmental and safety risks to miners themselves and the surrounding communities.

MRA’s acting managing director Nathan Mosusu appealed to the miners to adhere to the regulatory requirements, which is part of MRA’s regulatory compliance responsibilities.

Mr Mosusu said MRA has in the past demonstrated its openness and commitment to developing the alluvial sector in collaboration with miners, but it is the miners’ obligation to ensure they operate in compliance.

“I am asking miners to work with MRA for the betterment of the sector. Together we can achieve results,” Mr Mosusu said.

The Mining Act 1992, section 167 states – a person shall not carry on exploration or mining on any land unless he is duly authorised under this Act.

The MRA said the deaths of alluvial miners from cave-ins caused by unauthorised mining activities, and failures to adhere to safety requirements have become common.

It said tunneling and sluicing as part of these unauthorised operations has damaged local roads especially between Wau and Bulolo.

The Wau and Bulolo areas have a long history of alluvial mining that dates back to the 1920s.

At present, there are 81 active alluvial mining tenements and 50 inactive historic tenements granted under the previous mining legislation.

The 50 historic tenements are yet to be converted to alluvial leases recognised under the current Mining Act 1992. Once converted, the terms of these converted tenements would then ensure key safety and environmental aspects of mining operations are regulated appropriately.

Leave a comment

Filed under Papua New Guinea

Work on K3.9mil Tolukuma road delayed

The National aka The Loggers Times | September 13, 2018

WORK on the Tolukuma-Bakoiudu Road has been delayed because funds allocated for the project cannot be accessed, according to the Mineral Resources Authority.

“The K3.9 million earmarked for the 11.2km road is under the care of the Department of Finance as a result of the implementation of the Public Money Management and Regularisation Act 2017,” a statement from the authority said.

It was responding to a query from the Tolukuma Landowner Association on why the road construction had not started despite the funds having been allocated.

The contract for the road project was awarded by the Central Supplies and Tenders Board last November. The MRA then paid the contractor a mobilisation fee of K170,000 in December to start work in February this year.

It also paid K200,000 to the Department of Works to supervise the project.

Before more payments were made, the legislation came into force in April.

Funds were frozen by the Department of Finance.

“The implementation of the Public Money Management and Regularisation Act has affected not only this project but many other projects, even those funded by donor agencies such as the World Bank,” the statement said.

The authority said it had on several occasions requested the Department of Finance to allow it to access the funds but to date had not received any response.

Takeso Uson, the executive officer of the Tolukuma Landowner Association, said the tendering process was completed and K-Mele Construction had moved its machines to the project site.

Leave a comment

Filed under Papua New Guinea