Tag Archives: RTG Mining

Mining Subject To B’ville Govt

Panguna mine in operation, circa 1971 (Photo: Robert Owen Winkler/Wikimedia Commons)

Post Courier | May 7, 2019

All mining, oil, and gas powers and functions belong to the Autonomous Bougainville Government, says ABG vice president and mining minister Raymond Masono.

Mr Masono said this in response to a news article titled “Bougainville admonished by O’Neill over planned mining change” which was posted on social media through Radio New Zealand on Monday, April 29.

The ABG mining minister said the the transfer of these powers from the national government to the ABG was signed in March 2008 at Alotau between the late president, Joseph Kabui, and the then deputy prime minister, Sir Puka Temu.

“This process was in turn completed when the ABG passed its own mining law in April, 2015,” Mr Masono said.

“The ABG mining act is unique in the sense that it recognises landowners as owners of the minerals beneath the ground and not the crown or the state as in Papua New Guinea.

“The proposed amendment further consolidates this ownership rights by giving landowners and the ABG controlling interest in any major mining development project, starting with the Panguna mine through a Bougainvillean mining entity that would own 60 per cent of the shares on behalf of the landowners, ABG and the people of Bougainville.

“The Bougainville entity is not Caballus, it is the Bougainville advance mining company,” he said

Mr Masono said contrary to the Rio Tinto Group-aligned special mining lease Osikaiyang landowners association (SMOLA) that the amendments take away landowner rights, the proposed amendments give landowners more and better benefits in terms of equity and royalties than they are currently entitled to under the existing law.

“But the Panguna mine no longer belongs only to the RTG sponsored SMOLA, rather the mine belongs also to the other eight mine-affected landowners, whose land was used for mining purposes in the 17 years of operations and who support the amendment,” he said.

“It also belongs to all Bougainvilleans because the blood of 20,000 lives was spilled over the mine by Bougainvilleans, who died fighting to protect these resources.”

He said Bougainvilleans have consented that the Panguna mine must reopen, but not with Bougainville Copper Ltd and certainly not with RTG, two firms that are no doubt sponsoring those opposed the amendments. Mr Masono said relevant agencies have conducted and continued to carry out awareness to correct the misinformation, deliberate misinterpretation that are being propagated by those opposed to the proposed amendments.

The ABG is not rushing its work, it will continue to consult with landowners and the people of Bougainville before it passes the amendments.

“In addition to these consultations, the people of Panguna are now engaged in their own traditional social mapping process called ‘tangurang’ to identify the true landowners,” he said.

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Indigenous Rights Advocacy Group says ABG President Momis is not telling the truth

Prime Minister O’Neill has written to the ABG President raising concern over proposed changes to the Bougainville Mining law; concerns Momis is trying to downplay using ‘misinformation’

Chairman of a human rights organization, Bougainville Indigenous Rights Advocacy (BIRA), James Onartoo, has raised concerns that the ABG President Momis is deliberately trying to spread misinformation to push his government’s proposal to amend the Bougainville Mining Act.

Mr. Onartoo was responding to a draft letter of response by President Momis to concerns expressed by the Prime Minister in his letter to the President on the proposed amendment. The letter in which the President downplayed the Prime Minister’s concerns was posted recently on social media.

Mr. Onartoo said that the proposed amendment drew wide opposition because it removed protection of customary landowners’ rights and attempted to replace it with vague benefits and entitlements that lacked detail.

“You cannot remove and replace existing protection of the rights of customary landowners with imaginary rewards that may never materialize in the end,” he said.

Mr. Onartoo was also critical of the way ABG was handpicking people to drum up support in the mine affected areas to help push through the amendments. He said the ABG had never obtained “free, prior informed consent” (FPIC) in the mine affected areas and instead it has tried to avoid those who opposed mining, causing further divisions in the mine affected communities.

“Under FPIC the people have the right to say no to mining and the government should respect the wishes of the people and support them. Instead the government has gone abroad to make a deal and it is now trying to involved the landowners after the laws are drafted along with the proposed amendment to cater for monopolization of mining by a single mining company ”, Mr Onartoo said.

The Vice President, Raymond Masono and Finance Minister Robin Wilson left yesterday for Port Moresby to hand deliver the letter from President Momis to the Prime Minister, Peter O’Neill.

Meanwhile, ABG Parliamentary Legislative Committee’s inquiry into the amendment bill continues in Central Bougainville and according to it’s Chairman and member for Kokoda constituency, Rodney Osioco, there is a growing opposition from all stakeholders and the general public, to the proposed bill by the ABG to amend the Bougainville Mining Act.

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Bougainville President launches stinging attack on RTG

A lake in the pit of the long defunct Panguna mine in Bougainville. Photo: http://www.travelinspired.co.nz

President John Momis is stinging in his criticism of RTG Mining but the same critique surely applies equally to his own preferred option, Caballus Mining, and the previous horse he backed, BCL…

Radio New Zealand |19 March 2019 

The government in the autonomous Papua New Guinea region of Bougainville has dashed any hope it would work with the Australian miner, RTG, accusing the company of bribery.

The Bougainville government and RTG are promoting unrelated schemes to re-open the Panguna mine.

After a meeting between the two parties earlier this month, RTG’s chairman Michael Garrick felt they got a good hearing and there was a chance they’d work together in re-developing Panguna.

But Bougainville President John Momis said his government is emphatically rejecting the offer, and accuses the company of insensitivity and disregard for the customs, culture and sacrifice of all the people of Bougainville.

He said RTG’s achievements as a miner are limited and investors have no faith in its ability to deliver.

Granting a mining lease to RTG would pose an intolerable risk, Mr Momis said.

Mr Momis said payments and loans the government understands that RTG gave to members of one particular group of landowners, the Special Mining Lease Osikaiang Landowners Authority, constitute bribery, as do similar offers made to his government during the recent meeting.

Relevant agencies in PNG and Australia would be notified, he said.

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PNG minister issues warning over Panguna re-opening

Radio New Zealand | 18 March 2019

Papua New Guinea’s minister of Bougainville Affairs, William Samb, has called on the Bougainville government to forget about talking to investors in the Panguna mine until after the referendum on independence.

New Dawn FM reported Mr Samb was speaking during a Bougainville government roadshow around Bougainville that is explaining the referendum process.

His comments came after the government unveiled controversial plans to start its own company to re-open the mine, teaming up with a newly set up Australian company.

This has riled at least two other foreign investors who had been planning similar moves.

A year ago the government had declared a moratorium on opening Panguna but changed tack suddenly in January, saying it needed to open the mine to stimulate the economy ahead of the referendum vote in October.

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ABG rejects RTG Panguna proposal

The Panguna mine is one of the world’s biggest copper mines. (AAP Image: Ilya Gridneff)

12 March 2019

RTG Mining has announced the Autonomous Bougainville Government (ABG) has rejected a proposal to reopen the Panguna mine.

RTG’s proposal was backed by the Special Mining Lease Osikaiyang Landowners Association (SMLOLA) whose members are the Customary Owners of the land and mineral resources of the Panguna Mine (the area of the old EL 01)

RTG says it will now will consult with SMLOLA as to the steps to be taken in respect of this development.

Meanwhile, the ABG is pursuing its own mining plans with Australian Jeff McGlinn and Caballus Mining.

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Bougainville’s Momis says mining opponents are lying

Autonomous Bougainville Government President John Momis.

Radio New Zealand | 12 March 2019

The President of Bougainville says landowners who criticise the government’s proposed mining law changes have been misled.

The president announced plans for sweeping changes to the mining law in January, as the government sought money to help pay for the region’s referendum on independence from Papua New Guinea.

It has been criticised by landowning groups and human rights organisations but John Momis says these people have been misled by mining companies and others who want their own deals.

Mr Momis said the new law would greatly increase returns for landowners, earning them much more than the current measure which only guarantees their ownership of the minerals while they are in the ground.

“Under our proposal they own the resources, unextracted or extracted, and based on the known ore body we can raise the money ourselves.”

The mining law change would also see the government set up its own joint venture with an Australian entity, called Caballus.

The joint venture, to be known as Bougainville Advance Mining , would aim to re-open the huge and controversial Panguna mine.

The Bougainville referendum is set to be held in mid October.

Bougainville to go ahead with controversial law rewrite

Radio New Zealand | 12 March 2019

The Bougainville Government remains committed to rewriting the autonomous Papua New Guinea region’s mining law.

President John Momis says critics of the move are lying.

He says the new law would mean landowners retain ownership of the minerals after mining, making the benefits they receive much greater.

In January Mr Momis announced plans to change the law and team up with an Australian businessman, Jeff McGlinn, forming a company called Caballus.

It sparked an outcry but as Mr Momis told Don Wiseman his government is undeterred.

TRANSCRIPT

JOHN MOMIS: That will enable us to find a developer or investor to come in a joint venture with us, on the basis that we don’t pay anything because the Panguna ore body is a known ore body. It’s 65 billion kina worth. It’s known. And there’s only one Panguna mine – that’s excluding the Seven other Sisters. There are many companies in the world, if we gave them the mining licence they would go and raise money based on the value of this ore body. We, the landowners, will raise that, raise the money ourselves.

DON WISEMAN: yes but some of the key landowners say they are being shut out of this whole process.

JM: That’s not true. They are being lied to by RTG [Australian mining company] and others. Under the current mining law, which is better than the national mining law, the landowners only own the resource as long as it’s in the ground. Unextracted. Once it’s extracted the developer takes over and the landowner only gets five percent. If they wish to increase their share they can only increase it by another five percent, which they have to purchase. Under our proposal they own the resources, unextracted or extracted, and based on the known ore body we can raise the money ourselves.

DW: There has been criticism of your changes to this mining act. You clearly need to sell it more around Bougainville.

JM: That’s right, yes. I admit that our people made a mistake of not conducting a proper presentation, which they have subsequently done, and many people have seen and are saying, well, this is the best we have. We have – this week actually – while I am on the roadshow with the UN Nations Resident Co-ordinator and the Minister for Bougainville Affairs, we are going on a weeklong roadshow, our ministers will be conducting awareness amongst the members and others. We are very confident, once people understand. They have been misled or told that we are going to take everything away from the landowners. It’s nonsensical. in fact under our mining law they don’t even have to pay for their share because it’s their resource.

DW: Jeff McGlinn, though, he is not someone with a direct involvement in mining is he. I know he is involved in mining machinery and so on, but he’s not a miner.

JM: He’s not a miner, but there are mining companies in the world, we can hire the experts. I think it’s 65 billion US dollars worth of ore in the pit, the current Panguna pit, mineable over 27 years. That’s a lot of money.

DW: Well I guess  the critical thing is how much of it comes back to Bougainville?

JM: Well under our law, or proposed initiative, I think it’s 58 billion. 50 billion will come back to Bougainville and only eight billion will go to the  developer. under their proposal, [RTG] 50 billion will go to them and the poor Bougainvilleans will only get 8 billion.

DW: So you are going to get a developer to come in, spending billions redeveloping the mine and they are not going to earn very much from it.

JM: Well they will get a lot of money. We own the resources and I think it’s six billion to develop the mine, and they can get the money back, quite comfortably.

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RTG Mining Inc Presents plans for Panguna Mine

Pacific Mining Watch | March 1, 2019

The RTG mining inc a mining company which has established itself at Panguna with the former miner BCL was for the first time able to table its plan of developing Panguna to Bougainville leaders in Port Moresby.

RTG has been trying to meet with the ABG President, Grand Chief DR. JOHN MOMIS or the Mining Minister or better still the Bougainville Executive Council until yesterday when the BEC and including two members of the National Government, Member for Central Bougainville and former PNG Mining Minister, SAM AKOITAI and the member for South Bougainville and deputy Opposition leader TIMOTHY MASIU were able to make the presentation.

According to RTG’s comprehensive presentation presented by Michael Carrick, RTG Mining INC ‘s chairman, RTC would like to support the Autonomous Bougainville Government to fund the Bougainville Referendum, Provide Financial Support for activities of the ABG to further Bougainville, Provide technical skills and access to capital to develop Panguna and in the process unite all Bougainvilleans.

Several questions were made to the Chairman by the leaders who attended the presentation regarding the presentation of which MR. Carrick was able to answer them all.

The leaders especially the member for Central Bougainville, SAM AKOITAI said that RTG should not bribe the landowners by paying them and the ABG which is the government that will grant them the Mining licence.

He said Government support should only be made through company taxes and licensing fees.

The presentation ended with the leaders agreeing that Bougainvilleans including the landowners should iron out their differences and consider investors who want to work with the ABG and the landowners to develop Panguna.

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