Tag Archives: Chinese mining

Governor Orders Probe Into Ramu Nickel Mine

Gorethy Kenneth | Post Courier | November 28, 2018

MADANG Governor Peter Yama has commissioned a team of environmental experts to immediately conduct an environment damage assessment on the Ramu nickel mine.

Mr Yama announced this yesterday after raising serious concerns on how the Conservation and Environment Protection Authority (CEPA) has handled the environmental damages surrounding the Ramu Nickel Project in Madang.

“It would be irresponsible for me as governor for Madang not to outline to my people the provincial government’s stand on the current and future operations of the US$2.1 billion Ramu Nickel project,” he said.

At the end of 2012, the company completed full construction and started full operations, and was now operating at its peak.

Mr Yama had noted the landowners of Ramu Nickel project’s concern over:

  • The environmental impact, Ramu Nickel project is having on their lives; and
  • The lack of infrastructure, and social inclusion in the sustainability of their lives.

“These issues are serious and the state of the environment is currently unknown, I am aware that Conservation and Environment Protection Authority has not been monitoring the discharge of deep-sea tailings for a couple of years, posing a major threat to our marine environment.

“As such I have immediately commissioned a team of environmental experts including marine biologists to conduct an environmental damage assessment to better place me to seek redress.”

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Landowners Petition: Threats of Ramu Nico to shut down

Martha Louise | EMTV News | 23 November 2018

The landowners of Ramu Nico Project area have warned to shut down the company if their demands presented in a 3-page petition at 5:30pm yesterday (21 November, 2018) are not met within 7 days.

The landowners gave 7 days effective today (22 November, 2018) for the PNG government and the company to give them a favorably response to their demands.

Their actions follow the signing of the Mining Extension Agreement between the PNG and Chinese Governments and the Developer Ramu Nico Management LTD during the APEC.

As well as other issues affecting them since the establishment of the mine.

At around 5:30pm on Wednesday (21 November, 2018), the landowners presented their petition to Ramu Nico Management headquarters.

They say they do not know the content of the agreement signed, nor were they informed of the signing of the mining extension.

Adding they did not take into consideration the interest of the primary beneficiary, the landowners, the provincial government and the local level government.

They say since the establishment of the mine they have not been benefiting as expected.

Adding for the last 13 years they have not equally participated in the mine and have felt that they had been marginalized.

The landowners are demanding the PNG government and the Developer Ramu Nico, to respond to their four demands favorably before the 7 days lapse.

They also claimed a review of the MOA needs to be done as the previous MOA had already expired in March this year thus the company is operating illegally.

While also demanding a renewal of the compensation Agreement adding there was no relocation or resettlement program for landowners before the extension of the mine.

Ramu Nico Management Limited acknowledged the petition presented to them saying the MOU signed on Friday 16thin Port Moresby is only a high-level understanding.

This will pave way for other agreements and detail engagement which landowners will be consulted and will be required to get involved.

The company described the landowner’s reaction to the media and the threats to shut down the project as premature and irresponsible.

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MOU Between PNG and China Metallurgical (Group) Corporation

The Chinese have been ridiculed for the poor quality of some of their construction work for the Ramu mine

Post Courier | November 17, 2018

This MOU between PNG and China Metallurgical Cooperation continues since its inception in 2004 under the subsidiary development partner Ramu Nico Management Limited (MCC). The Ramu Nickel project under the MCC became solely responsible for all facets of the Project including financing, construction and operation. Having developed the Ramu Nickel Project into a world-class nickel and cobalt mining and refinery operation, MCC achieved successful operation of the project. In September 2016 when production nameplate capacity and design standard were achieved.

The purpose of the MOU in this regard to the forge that continuity and expansion of the project through MCCs further investment in the Ramu Nickel project on behalf of the development partners and the extent to which MCC proposes to invest in the expansion project. Further the MCC’s investment in the Expansion project will be a significant and concrete demonstration of the long-term commitment to and show string partnership China has with PNG and its continuous cooperation under the framework of “Öne Belt One Road” arrangement.

The Expansion project is also encouraged through excellent investment environment of PNG and will promote economic development for the State and local communities, improve labor training and employment, taxation and expense, local procurement and business, health and welfare, public infrastructure and administration among other benefits.

In concluding the signing will be done by Mining Minister Johnson Tuke of PNG and Mr Tang Fuping Chairman of China Metallurgical (Group) Cooperation on 16th November 2018

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China takes baby steps in the bottom of the Mariana Trench

The chubby, fish-like Qianlong-2 submersible is lowered from its mother vessel prior to a dive in the Indian Ocean. Photo- Xinhua.jpg

According to China’s oceanic authority, the next step for the country’s deep-sea technology is developing and testing a drilling facility named Shenlong, plus a mining platform named Kunlong and an information-sharing system called Yunlong.

Asia Times | October 22, 2018

China is getting closer to exploring the bottom of the ocean after a research mission deep in the Mariana Trench, the largest crack in the Earth’s surface that is more than 10 kilometers deep in the Pacific Ocean.

China’s oceanic research vessel Tansuo-1 returned to its home port of Sanya in southern China’s Hainan province last week, wrapping up a 54-day, 7,292-nautical-mile deep-sea research mission.

During the mission a team of 59 researchers remotely piloted and grabbed some close-up looks into the Mariana Trench.

Researchers from the Institute of Deep-sea Science and Engineering at the Chinese Academy of Sciences tested deep-sea equipment for geophysics, marine geology, geochemistry and marine biology.

Deep sea exploration vessel the Tansuo-1. Photo: Xinhua

During the expedition, two 7,000-meter-class deep-sea gliders operated continuously for 46 days, making it the only abyss-class glider in the world proven to be able to work continuously for an extended period of time under the sea.

A magnesium seawater fuel cell carried out two tests as the world’s first new metal seawater fuel cell tested in the 10,000-meter abyss. In addition, researchers also used a remote-controlled robot to complete high-definition live-streaming 10,000 meters down near the bottom of the trench.

Earlier this year, Chinese media reported the development of underwater platforms to be launched after 2020 to take samples on the bottom of the South China Sea, as well as plans to probe the Mariana Trench.

The People’s Daily has reported that China’s most advanced manned submersible, the Jiaolong, or “flood dragon” in Mandarin, was undergoing a retrofit at the National Deep Sea Center in the eastern coastal city of Qingdao.

Its next dive will be in the deepest part of the South China Sea, a central basin with an average depth of five kilometers. The Jiaolong can dive up to seven kilometers deep.

The launch of the Jiaolong is a landmark in China’s deep-sea exploration as scientists will be able to reach the sea floor for a closer look and complete refined sampling missions.

China is also developing a manned submersible that can dive to 11km and withstand the immense pressure with its sea trial scheduled in 2021, to “scour the bottom of the 11,034-meter-deep Mariana Trench,” according to the People’s Daily.

In April last year, the Jiaolong finished three dives in the South China Sea. It normally carries three people, a pilot and two scientists.

A dive usually starts around 7am and takes 10 hours. The three people inside can only move in a round, cramped space that has a diameter of 1.4 meters, said Gao Xiang, a senior engineer at the center.

According to China’s oceanic authority, the next step for the country’s deep-sea technology is developing and testing a drilling facility named Shenlong, plus a mining platform named Kunlong and an information-sharing system called Yunlong.

This equipment is expected to be finalized in 2020 and put into the South China Sea sometime after that.

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Ramu Mine Announces K4.8B Mine Expansion

The pipeline carrying slurry from the Ramu mine to the coast

Post Courier | October 1, 2018

RAMU NiCo Management Limited, the developer of the country’s first nickel, cobalt mining project last Thursday, announced expansion plans investing over US$1.5 (K4.8) billion into the project.

The Madang project expansion is expected to provide an additional one thousand plus job opportunities for locals when construction and production starts.

The announcement was made at the Ramu Project Update meeting organized by the Mineral Resources Authority (MRA), which was attended by project stakeholders, government department representatives, and landowners from four impacted areas.

Feasibility studies of the expansion project had already been completed which is covering new areas in the Kurumbukari plateau in Usino-Bundi district in Madang.

The product matrix in the expansion still remains the same as nickel/cobalt hydroxide (MHP).

Furthermore, the expansion is expected to increase production and reduce operation costs.

Ramu NiCo Management (MCC) Community Affairs Manager, Albert Tobe in representing the company highlighted that the project expansion report submission would be made to the MRA, Conservation and Environment Protection Authority (CEPA) and the Chinese Embassy following compilation of various approval procedures.

The scheduling of the signing of the memorandum of agreement (MoA) for the project expansion is expected to be done in November during the APEC Leaders Summit which it is also anticipated that the two leaders from PNG and China would also witness.

Vice president of Ramu NiCo (MCC), Wang Baowen in clarifying the project expansion at the meeting stated that the expansion is expected to support cash flow within the project area and create local business spin-offs for the locals.

Furthermore, it is expected to improve the living condition for people who relate to the Ramu.

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Can the law prevail over Chinese investments in Ecuador?

Police and Molleturo communities discuss procedures to monitor the suspension of mining activities. Photo: Manuela Picq

Manuela Picq | Intercontinental Cry | July 25, 2018

Last June, an Ecuadorean court ordered the suspension of all mining activities by a Chinese corporation in the highlands of Rio Blanco, in the Molleturo area of the Cajas Nature Reserve. It was a local court in Cuenca that gave the historic sentence: a court shut down an active mine for the first time in the history of Ecuador. Judge Paúl Serrano determined that the Chinese private corporation Junefield/Ecuagoldmining South America had failed to consult with the communities as required by Ecuador’s Constitution and by the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

Judge Serrano deemed the mining activity illegal and ordered the corporation to immediately suspend all its activities. Within two weeks, local communities accompanied police forces and local government officials in monitoring that the court order was respected.

The company appealed, and pressure was on the rise for the following hearing. The Chinese corporation privately offered $18 million to community leaders. Ecuador’s President, the Minister of Mines and the Minister of the Environment visited the province to pressure the local courts and indigenous communities to accept the mining activity. They defended “sustainable” mining as a form of development.

Affected communities consolidated their resistance, monitoring the access to the mine to impede mine workers to enter their territories, building support from neighboring communities, and informing the international community of the legal stakes.

On July 23, 2018, the court met again to either ratify or revert the decision to suspend mining activities in Rio Blanco. The court listened to all sides along with some expert testimonies; but there were discrepancies among the judges who postponed their verdict for another week.

Molleturo’s lasting vigilance for their waters

The Rio Blanco mine is located in the Molleturo-Mollepongo region, above ten thousand feet in the Andes. The mining license encompasses approximately six thousand hectares of paramos, lakes, and primary forests that nourish eight important rivers. This area replenishes the water system of the Cajas National Park, one of the largest and most complex water systems of Ecuador, which covers over a million hectares and holds immense water reserves.

The area is recognized as a natural biosphere reserve by UNESCO. These mountains have long been the home of Kañari-Kichwa indigenous communities. There are 12 archeological sites in the Molleturo area alone: the most famous one is the Paredones archeological site, located right by the mine.

The area is also a vital supply of water. These paramos provide water to 72 communities in Molleturo, freshwater to towns in the southern coast of Ecuador and to the city of Cuenca, the country’s third largest city which praises the quality of its drinking water.

The Rio Blanco mine is expected to be active for seven years, removing about 800 tons of rock per day and using cyanide to extract gold and silver. This entails an estimate of one thousand liters of water per hour that would be contaminated with deadly toxic waste, including arsenic, before being thrown back into rivers and soil.

Local indigenous communities were never consulted prior to the development of the project that would benefit from a recent Ecuadorean law incentivizing foreign investment. Nor did they give their consent to the licensing of their territories to the Junefield corporation. They reject the mine because it would contaminate their waters.

Women are at the forefront of the resistance that began almost two decades ago, when the mining license was first issued. Molleturo communities have been arguing in defense of water more or less actively over the last decade and a half but stepped it up when the mine started its activity in May 2018. Protests exploded, and a group burned out the miner’s living quarters.

Nobody was hurt in the explosion, but the police intervened, heavily armed, to militarize the area. The next day, protesters called in the president of Ecuador’s Confederation of Kichwa People Peoples for help, Yaku Perez Guartambel, but workers from the mine kidnapped him for eight hours, threatening to kill him. Tensions boiled to new heights.

Prior consultation as a fundamental indigenous human right

The Judge ordered the suspension on the mine–invoking constitutional and international indigenous rights to prior consultation.

Rosa, a delegate from the Andean Network of Indigenous Organizations (CAOI), discusses the territorial dimension of self-determination to community members gathered in the páramos of the Cajas mountain range. Photo: Manuela Picq

Since 1989, Art. 6 of the International Labor Organization Convention 169 safeguards indigenous rights to prior consultation on projects taking place on indigenous territories. Art. 18 of UNDRIP establishes indigenous rights to participate in decision making relating to their territories, and Art. 19 establishes that states must consult “in good faith” to obtain indigenous “prior, free, and informed consent: about legislative of administrative measures impacting their communities. In 2016, Art. 25 of the American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples reiterated these principles in the context of the Organization of American States.

Prior consultation is not a simple law; it constitutes a fundamental human right of indigenous peoples because their existence is intimately tied to their territories. Their culture, lifeways, and community structures are woven into territorial autonomy.

An Amicus Curiae from a Chinese environmental lawyer

About half a dozen amicus curiaes were presented to Cuenca’s court supporting the communities right to prior consultation, from a range of organizations including the Environmental Defense Law Center, Ecuador’s Ecumenic Commission of Human Rights (CEDHU) and the Ecuadorian group Critical Geographies. Amicus were presented by scholars from Ecuadorean and American universities, including Universidad Internacional del Ecuador, Universidad de Cuenca, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, American University, and Coastal Carolina University.

Environmental lawyer Jingjing Zhang, from Beijing, submitted an amicus in which she provided an overview of relevant Chinese laws and regulations. She testified to the court on July 23, 2018, explaining that China ratified the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007, thus supporting prior consultation and consent for any project on their territories. She reminded the words of the Chinese delegate at the 13th Session of the UN Permanent forum on Indigenous Issues (2014): “ the international community is duty bound to fully meet the legitimate requests of indigenous peoples, to promote and protect their basic human rights and freedoms, to safeguard the natural environment and resources on which their survival depends” and China “firmly supports the promotion and protection of the basic human rights and fundamental freedoms of all indigenous peoples around the world. ”

She explained to the court that China has regulations establishing that enterprises may not violate international treaties ratified by the Chinese government and that they are bound by the laws and environmental regulations of the host country. She stated that The Communist Party of China (CPC), State Council, and various government agencies have issued policy guidelines that encourage Chinese companies to focus on ecological environmental protection in their foreign investments. In her view, the Chinese government has deep concerns on the law-abiding and environmental performance of Chinese companies operating overseas.

Her amicus concluded that China’s Environmental Protection Law, Environmental Impact Assessment Law, and the Government Information Disclosure Regulation have strict provisions on the public participation rights of citizens. These regulations are based on the same principles and contain similar provisions to the Ecuadorian norms on the rights of indigenous peoples to prior consultation.

One step forward or two sets back?

The court sentence to suspend the mine marked a milestone of hope to Indigenous peoples and nature defenders. Yet the old tactics of legal warfare are still in use. Within a week of the court sentence, over 20 nature defenders were criminalized, eight of them charged with the crime of sabotage.

The private corporation Junefield/Ecuagoldmining South America did not have to do engage in public debate, Ecuador’s government is taking the lead. It was the Ministry of the Interior who accused indigenous peoples to defend the interests of the Chinese corporation. “The state proves that it is the best lawyer of mining companies,” says Yaku Perez Guartambel.

Will the criminalization of nature defenders continue? For now, judges are holding off a final verdict, and as the clock ticks political and economic pressures thicken. Molleturo leader Fausto Castro says that communities want their right to life back, and that they seek a peaceful solution to this mining conflict. It is indeed an achievement that serious confrontations were avoided, but this may not last forever. Yesterday, when the Judge staved off sentence as hundreds of nature defenders awaited outside the courtroom, many expressed their fears: “if the court reverts its sentence to benefit the State, it is a declaration of war.”

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Basamuk People Threaten To Shut Down Ramu Mine Refinery

View of the Ramu Nickel mine refinery. Image by Christopher McLeod/Sacred Land Film Project.

Jayne Safihao | Post Courier | 6 July 2018

While deputy Prime Minister, Charles Abel and a large team of government officers arrived yesterday in Madang for the much anticipated royalty payment to those affected in the Ramu Nico project, neglected Basamuk landowners have threatened to shut down the Basamuk refinery on Monday.

The threat was issued to the Ramu Nico management yesterday by executives of the Basamuk Landowners Association, in what was a ‘strained meeting’.

Spokesman and activist in the fight against having the deep sea tailings placement in Basamuk, Sama Mellombo, spoke strongly against the Mining Resource Authority (MRA), saying it had no legitimate powers to negotiate royalty payments.

He said that the Lands Department made an Improvement Inspection Report in 1999 which stated that the land should be forfeited and given back to customary landowners to improve.

Mr Mellombo said this was before the Mining Lease 42 was granted, “as described as to the depth of 30 metre below the natural surface of land situated near Basamuk”.

“Basamuk land is exempted from compulsory acquisition. Since the first Lands Titles Commission hearing in 2011 there has been no decision made over the land title. So after two LTC hearings no one can claim the land. We’ve had to go to the National Court to sort ownership issues but the courts say they are not the proper authority to decide who owns the land. It’s been a volley between the courts and LTC since,” he said.

“Now who has given MCC, the Chinese developer, the Basamuk land?”

MCC spokesperson, who did not want to be named, confirmed the meeting with Mr Mellombo’s team saying that the issue of Basamuk landownership was an “in-house dispute” between factions of landowners which has been prolonged and has put the company in an awkward position.

“The company can go ahead and pay them outstanding land use payments and such but this is hindering us. We recognize Mellombo as an LOA chairman though,” he said.

Mr Mellombo when asked if this was an in-house dispute, scoffed the idea saying:

“There is no in-house matter because according to MOA review of 2013, doesn’t allow two associations in one area. The company and the government are playing games and interfering with LOA affairs which they have no right to.”

The recognised groups within the project area to benefit today are Maigari Inland pipeline, Coastal pipeline and Kurumbukari LOA groups excluding the Rai Coast people in Basamuk.

It seems while the in-house matter is yet to be sorted out and LTC, yet to decide land ownership, the Chinese have somewhat put a refinery and Deep Sea Tailings Placement.

Mra Officers Allegedly Mishandling Landowners Issues

Jayne Safihao | Post Courier | 6 July 2018

The alleged mishandling of landowner issues by concerned MRA officers (named), in one of the impact areas of the Ramu Nico project may lead to the possible closure of the refinery at Basamuk.

In a petition, chairman of the Baasamuk Landowners Association Sama Mellombo, had singled two MRA officers as being very biased, not properly organising quarterly meetings and giving a complete blackout on project developments to the Basamuk LOA.

“I call on the Governor of the province, MPs for Madang and Rai Coast to get rid of these two gentlemen as they are not doing what they are supposed to be doing. MRA has not been paying our grants since, despite a competency jurisdiction hearing by the courts recognising us. These two gentlemen have been taking sides with certain individuals, coming to Madang and using it as a holiday resort and playing smart,” he alleged.

In the petition, he gave the company 48 hours before the refinery is shut down unless both men are replaced forthwith; that the refinery landowners identified by the Department of Lands and Physical Planning in 1999 be served on the proprietor, fully supported by a study of the Yangonan People of Rai Coast 1999 sponsored by Highlands Pacific and National Court order 2005/2010 regarding the subject land; and that the state show proof that Basamuk ground identified by Survey File No, 12/257 was legally acquired.

“We have been reliably informed that one MRA officer had a meeting to brief all the chairmen and executive committees of KBK, Inland and Coastal LOAs and singled out a Willie Galuk for reasons known only to himself. Who does Galuk represent? Not Basamuk I hope,” he said.

“We are concerned because this is not the first time the two officers have deliberately avoided Basamuk LOA executive committee since the outcome of the appeal to the National Court seeking to set aside the court order declaring that the election facilitated and conducted in Mindire village in 2016, was illegal.

“The landowners of Basamuk have been denied natural justice caused by these two officers who fail to remain impartial at all times when it comes to landownership issues. They see fit to be personally and deeply involved in the affairs of Basamuk LOA in-house matters that is causing the current status quo.

“Their actions are not in the best interest of the National Government through MRA and Ramu Nico management as they have failed to ensure four LOAs in the Ramu Nickel\Cobalt project has legal standing in the MOA; failed to conduct due diligence to ensure when conducting elections for associations over the years made sure of legal and statutory requirements according to association extract provided by the IPA for each term.

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