Nautilus emerges, barely alive and impotent: just can’t get that deep sea mining project up

The PNG Government applied to the Canadian Court unsuccessfully to regain some of its failed investment

Deep Sea Mining Campaign | 13 August 2019

In a court appointed meeting today in Canada the creditors of Nautilus Minerals voted to effectively liquidate the company.  The two main shareholders – MB Holding and Metalloinvest – have taken control of a very much shrunken Nautilus at the expense of major creditors and hundreds of hopeful small shareholders.

Nautilus, which has been seeking to start the Solwara 1 mine off the coast of Papua New Guinea, filed for court protection from its creditors under the Canadian Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (CCAA) in February 2019. With its court-appointed monitors, Price Waterhouse Cooper, Nautilus has given up trying to find possible buyers of its assets.

Andy Whitmore of the Deep Sea Mining Campaign said,

“This is effectively a ‘smash and grab’ raid by the two main shareholders. But the company is essentially worthless. Its equipment is tailored to the mining of deep sea hydrothermal vents which the world now agrees are too ecologically valuable to mine. Even other DSM companies such as DeepGreen suggest mining hydrothermal vents creates an unacceptably high level of environmental impact..

In addition to this, Nautilus still faces an ever-widening community opposition over its Solwara 1 mine.

Jonathan Mesulam of the Alliance of Solwara Warriors stated,

“We rejoiced when the company filed for protection from creditors in Canada. Our opposition and our court action have helped push it to that point. Communities across Papua New Guinean (PNG) want to see the nightmare of deep sea mining removed from PNG waters. We will re-double our efforts to ensure that the new Nautilus will never operate at Solwara 1.”

Andy Whitmore continued,

“Under the deal minor creditors will be fully repaid, while major ones will get 10% of what they are owed. The biggest loser is the PNG Government which held 15% equity in Nautilus PNG and the Solwara 1 project. It has been left stranded with a debt equivalent to one third of its annual health budget for country of 9 million people.” 

“The main shareholders through Deep Sea Mining Finance (DSMF) – the vehicle lending money to Nautilus – have swapped those debts for ownership of the company. While a cheap purchase, they end up owning very littleNautilus is a company with still no capital or support vessel to realise its deep sea mining ambitions. Also, because Nautilus was delisted from the Toronto Stock Exchange as part of the insolvency proceedings, the new Nautilus will now be a private company, and not open to the same level of scrutiny.” 

The PNG Government through its company Eda Kopa applied to the Canadian Court unsuccessfully to regain some of its failed investment. Smaller shareholders are considering a class action against the new company.

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Filed under Environmental impact, Financial returns, Papua New Guinea

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