Category Archives: Papua New Guinea

Geopacific sets up Woodlark development with $45m package

Geopacific’s Woodlark gold project is in the pacific ‘ring of fire’, home to some of the world’s best gold projects. Image: Geopacific.

Australian Mining | October 21, 2019

Geopacific Resources has completed a $40 million share placement to fund development of the Woodlark gold project in Papua New Guinea.

Additionally, Geopacific has also offered eligible Australian and New Zealand shareholders a share purchase plan, which will deliver a further $5 million.

The placement was made to sophisticated and professional investors for 1600 million fully paid ordinary shares at $0.025 per share, representing a 10.7 per cent discount to the last close.

The share purchase plan will be offered at $0.025 per share, allowing shareholders to acquire up to $30,000 of new shares.

Geopacific managing director Ron Heeks was pleased with the result of the capital raising, saying it showed the company’s shareholders were committed to seeing Woodlark start production.

“The capital raising has provided an excellent result, with shareholders demonstrating their commitment to moving Woodlark into production,” Heeks said.

“All shareholders, new and existing, clearly understand the tasks and rewards ahead and we are delighted and appreciative of their strong support to begin the process of producing gold.

“The raising will allow the company to commence early site works in preparation for process plant construction, which will enable gold production to be reached in a shorter timeframe.”

The capital raising’s net proceeds will fund front end engineering design, civil construction, relocating the Kulumadau village, mine camp upgrades, project financing costs and other development and expansion working capital.

The share purchase plan will open to shareholders on November 4 and close on November 29.

The Woodlark project is on an island in Papua New Guinea’s Milne Bay province. It is surrounded by world-class mines, including Newcrest Mining’s Lihir and St Barbara’s Simberi, and shows promise for a low-cost, simple processing project.

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Yama – Fight Will Continue Until Ramu Mine Ops Cease

Gorethy Kenneth | Post Courier | October 22, 2019

Madang Governor Peter Yama assured the people of Rai Coast that the fight on the pollution caused by slurry spill from the Ramu NiCo’s Basamuk refinery would continue until the mine was successfully closed.

He travelled to Bindeng in Saidor, Rai Coast district, to officially close the week-long Kangal Festival last week.
The people of Bindeng called on the governor to pressure the national government to shut down the Ramu NiCo mine.

Spokesman Daniel Kala said it had almost been a month and the people had not heard from the national government on it actions to protect the people and the environment.

He said the ban imposed by the Madang provincial administration on the selling of fish in the province had affected their school children as well as their daily income opportunities.

Mr Yama said because of the urgency of the issue he had to rush from last Thursday’s Parliament session to be with the people and to brief them on the actions he had taken to pressure the government to take measures.

“I flew back to Madang and addressed my people on the stand the government would be taking on the Basamuk slurry spill incident. I assured my people at the Kangal Festival at Bindeng that I will continue to fight and make sure the mine closes,” he said.

He also urged his people to work together if they wanted to see change in their area. The slurry spill incident has caused fear among the people, especially when they go out to the sea, he said.

He said also that for too long the people and provincial government had not benefited from the mine and had become mere spectators on their own land.

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Filed under Environmental impact, Papua New Guinea

Porgera Mine – A World Class Disaster

The Porgera gold mine has made people slaves on their own land, forced to scrape in the polluted mine tailings to try and earn the money to buy food and basic essentials. The owners of Barrick Gold and Zijin Mining should hang their heads in shame…

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Filed under Human rights, Papua New Guinea

PM Gives Assurance Of Further Ramu Mine Probe

Post Courier | October 18, 2019

Prime Minister James Marape says investigations into Ramu Nickel Mine slurry spill at Basamuk Bay in Madang will continue.

He said this after a lengthy and heated debate in Parliament yesterday after a report on the August 24, 2019, incident was presented by Environment and Conservation and Climate Change Minister Geoffrey Kama.

“I note most Members of Parliament have a conversation to make in regards to this ministerial statement presented,” Mr Marape said.

“As indicated by the minister, there’ll be further assessment and investigation.

“Every stakeholder, including the Governor for Madang (Peter Yama), has every right to have an interest in this matter.

“When matters relate to the security of our people, the interest of our people, and matters relating to the environment, it is just and responsible that we all have a concern.

“We note the concern that was raised by every Member of Parliament, especially the Governor for Madang and Member for Rai Coast (Peter Sapia) in the immediate precinct and affected areas.

“We are grateful for the comments by every leader this afternoon, in response to the statement minister has made.

”
Mr Marape said Northern Governor Gary Juffa had made a strong statement, as well as Kompiam-Ambum MP and former Environment and Conservation Minister, Sir John Pundari.

“Every other statement is also correct, finding the right balance,” he said.

“Our harvest of resources comes from the price on our environment.

“We’ve allowed those investors to come in, but the investors who come in must operate within responsibility and due care to our environment, to our country, and to our people.

“I think from the outset, without the specifics on the impact on the environment, the fact that there was a practical defect in the structure of the mine itself is an incident that warrants deeper study into what was taking place, in as far as the mine safety and operation is concerned.

“Cabinet did indicate this to the minister, and I note that minister’s statement embraces further investigation, further assessment.

“Let me assure people of Madang, people of Rai Coast, people of Usino-Bundi and people of this country, that this report and the investigation thus far is not conclusive and that is not the end of the story.

“The fact that there was a slip, which took place in the mine infrastructure, irrespective of the extent of the damage, warrants deeper scrutiny, deeper investigation, deeper assessment.”

Mr Marape assured the people of Madang, Usino-Bundi, Rai Coast, as well as the country, that all stakeholders including Madang government, Conservation and Environment Protection Authority (CEPA), Mining Department and other Government agencies would look deeper into what had happened.

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Madang people suffering from Ramu mine spill

A spill into the bay earlier this year turned the sea red. Photo: Facebook/ Elisha Wesley Mizeu

Luwi James | Post Courier | 18 October 2019

It is confirmed that sea waters in Madang is contaminated and poisoned by highly toxic slurry spill from the Basamuk refinery in Raicoast few months ago.

The independent Swiss specialist Dr Mojon who was engaged by the Madang provincial administration has confirmed this in his findings.

This will have a negative impact on the lives of people.
Madang provincial government has already warned the people not use or consume fish from the sea and this is likely to continue on for an indefinite period of time depending on the assessment and solution of this problem.

People living by the sea and on the islands like Karkar, Krangket, Manam,Bagbag, Long Island and other smaller islands have already started feeling the effect.
 The sea is their life and poisoning it is simply starving them to death.

The microsocio-economic cycle and protein supplement of these people has been completely snapped.

This issue also affects tuna production in Madang. Currently, the company is canning fish which are in stock and may stop canning, awaiting the purification of the sea from the poison. People are also afraid to buy canned fish sold in stores and supermarkets.

The deep sea tailing project (DSTP) has been challenged in court by landowners of Basamuk and MCC. The court issued the direction to have constructive measure and a proper regulation system in place to closely monitor the facility but this has never been done which has resulted in the spill and poisoning of sea water.

The people of Raicoast and those on the islands are experiencing all kinds of illnesses.
 Vegetation near the shores are turning yellow and drying up. Dead fish are filling the sea shores. People have been attributing these matters to black magic and sorcery but now they have come to realise that toxic waste from the mine has been the cause of these problems.

The department of environment, conservation and climate change and developer MCC are rebutting the report of the scientist is ridiculous. They are showing their lack of concern for the damage done and how to solve this issue amicably.

The Madang provincial administration must be applauded for undertaking this issue seriously and that the mine has to stop until all investigations are done and proper measures are in place to guarantee the safety of our people.

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Filed under Environmental impact, Human rights, Papua New Guinea

Yama Claims Two Dead After Eating Contaminated Fish

Post Courier | October 18, 2019

MADANG Governor Peter Yama claims two men have died after eating contaminated fish caught in the polluted Basamuk area.

He told Parliament yesterday that post-mortems would be done soon to confirm his fears.

Mr Yama said this when disputing a statement by Minister of Environment and Conservation, Geoffery Kama, which dismissed the seriousness of the situation at Basamuk.

Mr Kama had told parliament that the discoloration of sea water was due to 200, 000 liters of raw slurry that had overflowed from one of the company’s surge tanks within the Basamuk plant site and did not pose any danger to the environment or people. Tests have also been done to prove this, he said.

“Due to the tests done, I would like to inform this house that marine waters around Basamuk Bay and nearby areas are safe to swim, and for recreational purposes only.”

An irate Mr Yama demanded for the immediate closure of the Ramu nickle mine until proper scientific and environmental tests were done. “Next week six scientists will be in Madang not in the name of Peter Yama but for the interest of the people of Madang, East Sepik, Morobe and West Sepik and the country,” he said.

“Why are the animals dying and ending up on the shore of the bay, why are we telling lies, close the mine, prosecute and send them packing or else you will see a protest march that will close down Madang Province.

“This plant at Basamuk is the worse mine this government has allowed to sit in the province, the way it is set up is not like a mine,” he added.
Mr Yama claimed the company had not paid any taxes to the Government or paid royalties to landowners.

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CEPA Says Madang Waters Are ‘Safe’ – but warns against eating fish!

Elias Nanau | Post Courier | October 18, 2019

The Conservation and Environment Protection Authority (CEPA) has assured that the waters around the Basamuk area in Madang are safe and free of toxic contamination.

CEPA officials gave the assurance yesterday following tests and conclusion of water samples tested at the Australian Laboratory Services in Brisbane.

Michael Wau, director for Environment Regulatory operations, took the media through the findings yesterday. He said water samples were obtained from the villages of Naglau, Duman, Domestic Wharf and Drains 1 and 4 outlets.

Their average concentrations were below baseline concentrations and met environment permit conditions, Mr Wau said. He said out of the 200,000-litre slurry spill, 100,000 was contained within the refinery while 80,000 spilled into the Basamuk Bay. The slurry spill was said to have been caused by pump failure.

“Results of samples did not indicate major interference with sea water composition apart from turbidity caused by outfall material after heavy rains,” he said.

Environment and Conservation Minister Geoffrey Kama who joined the presentation endorsed the statements by his officers. “I think everything is back to normal,” he said.

“It’s not about the color, we want to detect the metals,” has said whilst cautioning the local people not to consume any fish caught in the area until further test were done to make the findings conclusive.

“We are not here to support the company, we are not here to tell lies,” Mr Kama said.
 He said CEPA would engage two independent scientists to sample toxic contamination from fish and this exercise would be completed within four weeks.

While the Madang Provincial Government-sponsored Swiss scientist Dr Alex Mojon and his report appear to contradict CEPA’s report, they told the media they were not able to critique or criticize the report without the benefit of reading it.

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